Project Connect continues efforts to feed hungry families in North Nashville

When a tornado touched down March 3 and left a 60-mile path of devastation through Middle Tennessee,  Project Connect Nashville knew what it had to do: Serve hot meals to North Nashville residents whose neighborhoods had been badly damaged.

The day after the storm, PCN — whose mission is to build relationships with individuals stuck in a cycle of poverty and connect them to the faith community, living wage jobs, and stable housing — established a central command for recovery, food, and supplies distribution.

PCN employees Quanita Thomas and the Rev. Ella Clay were essential in startup operations. Clay offered the church at which she pastors, the Historic First Community Church at 1815 Knowles St., and Thomas assisted with making connections in the neighborhood, helping even though her own home was damaged by the storm.

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Volunteers feed those in North Nashville following the March 3 tornado. [Project Connect Nashville]
Volunteers immediately began tracking of the needs of the neighborhood’s residents: Who lived where, how many meals each house needed, and even whether a home had names to add to their ongoing prayer list. The first two weeks after the storm were the most demanding because many of the homes did not have power, said Laura Ingram, PCN’s North Nashville Location Manager.

“We have about 400 addresses of people who we try to feed multiple times a week,” Ingram said. Those residents include families and those whose mobility is limited, such as seniors and individuals with disabilities, who otherwise would not have been able to access food in the wake of the disaster.

PCN, in partnership with Just the Crumbs — a faith-based mobile food unit from Columbia, Miss. — now serves and delivers meals five days a week, and offers essential resources to the community two hours a day at its North Nashville Resource Center at 1811 Knowles Street.

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Just The Crumbs is a disaster relief ministry that has been aiding PCN with food distribution efforts in North Nashville. [Project Connect Nashville]
When COVID-19 got a foothold in Middle Tennessee two weeks after the tornado and more people began staying at home, Ingram says PCN’s volunteer numbers began to dwindle. But she and her colleagues continued their efforts.

“Serving people food was something we really felt we needed to keep doing as it’s too risky for the elderly and disabled to get out and shop for fresh foods,” Ingram says.

As a precaution, PCN is limiting volunteer groups to six people, who are asked to maintain a safe distance when delivering meals. The organization provides gloves, and volunteers are asked to bring their own masks if possible.

“These volunteers are invaluable to us because PCN feels it does take a village to love this wide variety of people and neighborhoods,” Ingram says. “It’s something we can’t do alone, but together we are able to check on everybody and make sure no one is falling through the cracks.”

The idea for Project Connect Nashville was birthed out of the 2010 flood, when PCN’s executive director, Alan Murdock, coordinated recovery in partnership with the East Nashville community through his garden center in Five Points. The organization has now opened campuses in South and North Nashville, and offers classes to provide knowledge, skills, and encouragement, while offering a faith community to support individuals through life’s joys and struggles.

To volunteer with Project Connect Nashville, sign up here. For a list of needed donations, click here.

For the Community Resource Center, volunteers are key to meeting critical needs

The days since a tornado tore through Middle Tennessee just over a month ago have been long and exhausting for Tina Doniger and Maria Amado, who serve as the executive director and board chair, respectively, of the Community Resource Center. The CRC, which regularly supplies basic essentials to agencies serving vulnerable populations in more than 24 counties, was activated following the storm to serve as Metro Nashville’s collection and distribution point for donations deployed to survivors throughout the region.

For Doniger and Amado, even though the days sometimes blur together, it’s the acts of kindness and generosity that stand out.

Amado shares the story of Levi, a 3-year-old boy who came to the center with his grandmother to drop off donations.

“Levi is about 3 and a half, 4 years old, and he is sucking his thumb,” Amado recalls, retrieving a sandwich bag of coins and dollar bills from across the room. “And he had emptied out his piggy bank. For the kids who lost their homes.”

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Joe Pollard, left, hands the keys of his newly donated truck to the Community Resource Center’s Maria Amado, center, and Tina Doniger, right.

Then there’s Joe Pollard, president of the Bank of Odessa, Mo., who, upon realizing the CRC didn’t have a box truck of their own, donated the one he had driven down to donate supplies. It was a spur-of-the-moment decision that left Doniger and Amado speechless.

The stories of generosity add up — volunteers who came for two hours and stayed for two weeks, those who took time off from their own jobs to volunteer, those who donated knowledge and skills to help the CRC expand its reach — and take the shape of a community pulling together to make an impact far greater than could have been made by one or two individuals.

As COVID-19 sent shock waves through the region, complicating tornado relief efforts and compounding community needs, Doniger says the CRC has continued to evolve its disaster response to meet those rapidly shifting needs.

“The service we provide is essential for people moving forward,” says Doniger — who is the CRC’s sole paid employee. “There’s now even more added pressure on the people who have been serving, and more added pressure on us to find people to help.”

Keeping volunteers healthy is top of mind for Doniger, who says she provides every safety measure she can for volunteers. She provides gloves, masks, and disinfectant. Within the warehouse, volunteers stay apart, sorting their donations on their respective shelves. Donation drop-offs are now conducted without any person-to-person contact.

“The only way to keep going is for people to help us do the work,” Doniger said. “If we don’t continue doing what we do, we won’t be prepared to service the people. As long as we are healthy, and we can open this door, we are going to serve people no matter what.”

To aid the CRC in its mission of serving those in need, sign up to volunteer here.

Disaster Relief Efforts: Ways to Help

Thank you, everyone, for your support and willingness to volunteer following the devastating tornadoes that moved through Nashville on March 3. This post contains information on resources on ways to help. If you are needing assistance, please click here.

Donate Money

  • Folks wanting to donate money can do so through the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee’s Middle Tennessee Emergency Response Fund.
  • To donate to Nashville’s COVID-19 Response Fund, click here.
  • Schools cannot accept monetary donations directly. If you are moved to give to a Metro school, please make checks payable to Metro Nashville Public Schools and mail your donation to MNPS, c/o Business Office, 2601 Bransford Ave.,
    Nashville, TN 37204. Please put “Tornado Relief” in the memo. More info on fundraising is available here
  • The Nashville USBG — a 501c3 not-for-profit team of hospitality educators — has organized a GoFundMe, with plans to direct donations toward service industry professionals in need of “assistance with medical bills, loss of employment or home damage, and funeral costs for the families of our community who have lost lives in last night’s natural disaster.”
  • To donate directly to the Red Cross disaster relief fund, click here.
  • Tennessee Action for Hospitality has created a fund to support individual hospitality professionals who plan to continue their career in Tennessee when this crisis is over. The Tennessee Action for Hospitality Assistance Fund was created in partnership with The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee. To donate, click here. 
  • United Way of Greater Nashville, which is working with the Office of Emergency Management, is accepting donations for its Restore the Dream Fund which provides long-term disaster recovery.

Donate Food

Donate Blood

Donate Items

  • Donate Medical Supplies for Community Assessment System — The Nashville Convention & Visitors Corp. is asking local businesses to donate  latex gloves and masks to help with the city’s COVID-19 response. Donations can be taken to the Community Resource Center, 218 Omohundro Place, Nashville, TN 37210. Large donors should fill out a form at covid19.nashville.gov.
    Other needs:

    • Surgical face masks and N-95 masks
    • Isolation gowns
    • Disposable exam gloves
    • Sani-cloth wipes
    • Face shields
    • Hand sanitizer
    • Specimen bags
    • Red top viral tubes (lab supply)
    • Nasal swabs (lab supply)
    • Large trash cans.
  • The Community Resource Center  (218 Omohundro Place, Nashville, TN 37210) is collecting items to distribute throughout affected areas. Visit the CRC’s Instagram feed to see their daily updates about most-needed items.
    • Hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday.
    • Those dropping off donations are asked to stay in their vehicles and volunteers will come outside to remove your donations.
    •  You can donate using Venmo (Username: @CRCNashille) or through its website.
    • You can also order off of CRC’s Amazon wishlist, (Address is 218 Omohundro Place, Nashville TN, 37210 if it doesn’t populate.)
  • Little Scholars Child Development, 1206 Buchanan St, Nashville, TN 37208, is accepting donations to be packaged and redistributed in the North Nashville community.

Donate Time

  • If you would like to volunteer during this time, please know volunteer opportunities are limited, and only being scheduled for groups of 10 or less. For a full list of opportunities, please click here.

A letter from our CEO regarding confirmed COVID-19 case

We received news today that a volunteer who served at Greater Heights Missionary Baptist Church has been diagnosed with COVID-19; they volunteered there on several occasions during the initial tornado relief response and were last there Saturday, March 14.

Since COVID-19 can be spread from contact with contaminated surfaces, as well as person-to person, we are notifying all Hands On Nashville volunteers who registered to participate at Greater Heights from March 5, when they opened for tornado relief, to present. The church is ceasing volunteer activities at this time and will remain closed to volunteers for two weeks.

Please continue to closely monitor how you’re feeling and reach out to your medical provider with any concerns. The health and safety of our volunteers, community partners, and neighbors-in-need remains our priority as always, and most especially, during this difficult season.

With much gratitude,
Lori Shinton
Hands On Nashville President & CEO

COVID-19 Update: Staying Safer at Home

We’re writing to share some information regarding Mayor Cooper’s Safer at Home order from Sunday, March 22.

This order asks us to stay inside our homes and immediately limit outside interaction to essential activities only. (Think groceries, prescription refills, picking up take-out, and walking the dog.) On those occasions when you are out of your home for necessary tasks, stay at least six feet away from others.

This will further impact volunteer projects, so you may hear from us about additional cancellations and rescheduling.

Here’s the link to the full order and some information you need to know:

If you have lost your job or income due to layoffs associated with the COVID-19 crisis, you can find updated information about local job openings and opportunities here.

YOU CAN … 

  • Go to the grocery, convenience or warehouse store
  • Go to the pharmacy to pick up medications and other healthcare necessities
  • Go to medical appointments (check with your doctor or provider first)
  • Go to a restaurant for take-out, delivery or drive-thru
  • Care for or support a friend or family member
  • Take a walk, ride your bike, hike, jog and be in nature for exercise — just keep at least six feet between you and others.
  • Walk your pets and take them to the veterinarian if necessary
  • Help someone to get necessary supplies
  • Receive deliveries from any business which delivers

YOU SHOULD NOT … 

  • Go to work unless you are providing essential services as defined by this Order
  • Visit friends and family if there is no urgent need
  • Maintain less than 6 feet of distance from others when you go out
  • Visit loved ones in the hospital, nursing home, skilled nursing facility or other residential care facility, except for limited exceptions as provided on the facility websites.

For more information, please see the frequently-asked questions on the City of Nashville’s COVID-19 Response page

A letter from our CEO regarding unconfirmed COVID-19 case

In the spirit of being a good neighbor and out of an abundance of caution, we want to share some information we received about a volunteer who participated in recent tornado relief efforts.

We learned yesterday evening that an individual who served at the Hands On Nashville office, Community Resource Center, and at Shelby Bottoms between March 6 and March 13 is experiencing mild symptoms that have been associated with COVID-19 as of Sunday, March 15. This person has been in contact with their medical provider, who declined to recommend them for further testing. As a precaution, the individual is self-isolating for 14 days per the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control.

Although this is not a confirmed case of COVID-19, we have a few things we’d like to share:

  • Volunteers are welcomeSince last Friday, we put extra precautions in place that allow you to take care of yourself while you’re helping take care of others. Upon hearing from the individual, we took additional steps to disinfect the buildings thoroughly and reach out to those who may have been in the same space as the person experiencing the symptoms.

Service is a key part of what will keep our community strong during this moment when many of our neighbors are faced with especially difficult challenges. With that top of mind, we will actively continue updating our policies in alignment with the best practices provided by the CDC and our local health officials. We need and we appreciate your continued support.

Lori Shinton
Hands On Nashville President & CEO

Nashville Tornado Relief Efforts: Things to Know

In this post, we will be updating information as it becomes available. To view our list of resources, click here. If you are looking to volunteer or donate to a disaster relief cause, click here. To view updated recommendations regarding volunteering and COVID-19, click here

4:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 25

Tornado Debris Collection Update from Metropolitan Nashville Department of Public Works:
MNDPW is temporarily pausing debris pick-up in tornado impacted areas for 2 weeks. The city would like to give residents in these areas an opportunity to get debris onto the curb, and will resume pickup on April 6, 2020. At that time, they will resume regular circulation through all impacted areas in an effort to remove all curbside tornado debris.

Regular brush pick up will continue as scheduled.
Don’t forget to follow the Tornado Debris Guidelines, available at http://bit.ly/DebrisGuidelines.

10:47 a.m. Thursday, March 19

The Red Cross is experiencing severe blood shortages right now due to canceled blood drives across the country. If you are able to donate blood, you can fulfill a critical need felt by our neighbors. Click here to learn more about the need and the measures the Red Cross is taking to protect donors from COVID-19 exposure. Then click here to schedule an appointment.

2:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 17

Hands On Nashville extends our thanks to hubNashville and more than a dozen local roofing professionals for their collaboration this past week in which more than 45 roofs were tarped by volunteers in response to the devastating March 3 tornado.

As of today, hubNashville and HON are no longer accepting requests for volunteer roof tarping.

hubNashville is available year-round, and is a one-stop shop to request Metro Nashville Davidson County services and information, available by calling 311, visiting hub.nashville.gov, or through the hubNashville 311 app.

Special thanks to:
Mr. Roof Nashville
Above All Roofing TN
Brothers In Business
A-Team Roofing
Reach Out WorldWide
Integrity Home Inspections
Roof It Forward
Centennial Services Roofing
Rhythm Roofing

1:58 p.m. Tuesday, March 17

The HON team continues to make adjustments to volunteer projects and recommendations in light of the rapidly shifting nature of COVID-19. Click here to read the latest.

Continue reading Nashville Tornado Relief Efforts: Things to Know

Hands On Nashville will postpone 10,000 for 10

In mid-2019, Hands On Nashville recognized that an important time was approaching for our city — the 10-year anniversary of the devastating 2010 flood. To commemorate Nashville’s spirit of service then and to look forward to how we could prepare for future disasters, we began planning 10,000 for 10 — a call to action for volunteerism and the kickoff for establishing the Hands On Nashville Disaster Activation Fund.

No one could have predicted what would happen the night of March 2, or the rapid spread of COVID-19 in our community. What we could have predicted is the incredible outpouring of love and support in the form of 26,000-plus volunteers who stepped up to help their neighbors in the aftermath.

While the purpose behind 10,000 for 10 feels more urgent than ever, we recognize the need to pause our events — the Mary Catherine Strobel Volunteer Awards, Hands On Nashville Day, and the HON Day Afterparty  in alignment with Centers for Disease Control recommendations to postpone large-scale gatherings.

We are working on identifying a reschedule date for later this year, and will share information as soon as it is available. If your agency was planning a HON Day project, you had purchased a ticket to the Strobel Awards, or you had signed up to be a volunteer or volunteer leader on HON Day, please know that we will be in touch once we have updated information about the rescheduled events.

It is clearer than ever that HON must be prepared to pivot quickly to meet challenges big, small, and difficult to predict. We’re honored to have your support on that journey.

 

Disaster Relief Efforts: Resources

Thank you, everyone, for your support and willingness to volunteer following the devastating tornadoes that moved through Nashville on March 3. This post contains information on resources for those in need of help. If you are looking to offer assistance, please click here. Due to information rapidly changing, it is encouraged to reach out to these resources directly to verify information. 

General Disaster Relief Information and Resources

  • If you were affected by the Middle Tennessee tornado and
    still need assistance, call the Tornado Recovery Connection at 
    (615) 270-9255.
  • The City of Nashville releases daily information about the COVID-19 disaster response. For information about state unemployment, CDC guidance, FEMA COVID-19 rumor control, the Federal Trade Commission scams resource website, or applying for a small business administration loan, click here.
  • If you need information or assistance with tornado relief, Metro Social Services can be reached at (615) 862-6432 for services over the phone.
  • The Metro Nashville Office of Emergency Management is also a resource for those affected by the tornado. Their office is located at 2060 15th Ave S, Nashville, TN 37212. Contact information is (615) 862-8540 or piodesk@nashville.gov
  • United Way of Greater Nashville offers an inclusive resources service, where those affected can call 2-1-1 for its referral helpline, which can provide up-to-date information on emergency shelters, food pantries and related services. For information, visit unitedwaynashville.org/programs/2-1-1.

Item Distribution Centers

  • Martha O’Bryan Center, 711 S. 7th St., Nashville, TN 37206, is offering food distribution from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Meals to children 18 and younger will be provided from 7:30 to 9 a.m. Monday through Friday at KIPP Kirkpatrick Elementary, 1000 Sevier St, Nashville, TN 37206. For financial assistance, call (615) 254-1791.
  • Project Connect will host a distribution center and serve hot meals from 1 to 3 p.m. daily at 1811 Knowles St., Nashville, TN 37208.
  • Schrader Lane Church of Christ, 1234 Schrader Lane, Nashville, TN 37208, is open to donate food. Hours are 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Food Banks and Distribution

  • The Nashville Food Project is working with its partners to create “grab and go” style meals. They will be serving meals door-to-door with Gideon’s Army at the Cumberland View Apartments, Cheatham Place, and Andrew Jackson Apartment properties each weekend until April 5. If you know of a shelter or community hub in need of food support, let them know.
  • Second Harvest Food Bank provides food to those who need it. Using our FIND FOOD tool, you can find the nearest food distribution to you. Click here: secondharvestmidtn.org/GET-HELP.
  • The Little Pantry That Could, 2011 24th Ave N., Nashville, TN 37208, offers meals to anyone in need, no questions asked from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. For information, visit thelittlepantrythatcould.org.
  • Metro Nashville Public Schools will be offering free student meals along with food boxes provided by Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee at sites identified throughout Davidson County. For locations, click here.
  • The Nashville Rescue Mission is offering meals across the city daily. For information, click here.

Financial Assistance and Tax Information

  • The American Red Cross has extended the deadline to April 7 to offer financial assistance for people whose homes were destroyed or had major damage due to the March 3 tornado. An application process is available over the phone from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. To apply, call 800-RED-CROSS (800-733-27677) and press prompt 4.
  • Beyarata Mobile Disaster Tax Services is offering federal disaster claims for unreimbursed casualty losses. Staff can assist those with an annual income of $65,000 or less, they will determine if victims qualify and file federal disaster claims for free. The deadline to file on current year tax return is July 15, 2020. For more information, call (901) 215-6005.
  • The Boomer Esiason Foundation created a fund that directly assists those families in the cystic fibrosis community affected. To apply for funding through the Cystic Fibrosis Patient Disaster Relief Program, click here.
  • The Donelson Fellowship has set up a disaster relief fund, and its pastor has encouraged people personally affected by the storm to contact office@donelson.org.
  • From Your Father, a local nonprofit, focuses on the social determinants of health. Resources can be supplied to single mothers to provide economic stability, education, health and health care, social and community context, and home-purchasing resources. For information, fromyourfather.org.
  • MusiCares, an organization offering music-industry specific financial assistance, is aiding people in all facets of the music industry with financial support. This includes artists, songwriters, publishers, engineers, tour bus drivers, concert production crew, stagehands, studio musicians, music venue employees and more, nationwide. Those in need do NOT need to be a member to get help. Please reach out to the local office for help applying for financial assistance related to the tornado, gig/tour cancellations, health challenges and other life events. For more information, call (800) 687-4227 or visit musicares.org.
  • The Tennessee Action for Hospitality has begun “A Fund for Us,” to supportindividual hospitality professionals who plan to continue their career in Tennessee. To see application criteria and apply, click here.
  • Tennessee Department of Human Services Emergency Pandemic TANF – Emergency cash assistance program for those impacted by COVID-19. Emergency Pandemic TANF will utilize existing Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) funds. TDHS encourages Tennesseans in need to apply online when the application becomes available in order to encourage social distancing. To create an account, click here.

Government Assistance

  • The Tennessee Department of Human Services will be providing its COVID-19 Essential Employee Child Care Payment Assistance program until June 15. It is designed to help support essential workers so they can stay on the job during the state of emergency. Those interested can apply here. After an essential employee is approved for the program, the state will arrange to pay for child care at a TDHS licensed program,  YMCA, or a Boys & Girls Club where the child is currently served.
  • Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security’s (TDOSHS) Driver Services division has waived in-person photo requirements and extended license expiration dates due to the COVID-19 outbreak. For more information, click here.
  • For those concerned about scams following the March 3 tornado: The Tennessee Division of Consumer Affairs can be reached at (615) 741-4737 or online.

Health and Wellness

  • COVID-19
    • HON has compiled information about volunteering amid COVID-19/Coronavirus concerns here.
    • Individuals who are ill and would like to learn more about COVID-19 tests can do so here.
    • To combat the spread of COVID-19, the Metro Public Health Department has issued a Safer at Home Order directing all residents of Nashville and Davidson County to stay inside their homes unless they are engaged in certain “essential activities.” Read more here.
  • Medical Care
    • Dr. Jeffery Sonsino with Optique Nashville is offering free eye care treatment to those injured. Services offered from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday through Friday at 2817 West End Avenue Suite #117, Nashville, TN 37203. Call 615-321-4393 for more information.
    • Asbestos & Natural Disasters Guide to cleaning up after a tornado from the Mesothelioma Center.
  • Mental Health
    • The Tennessee Recovery Project is offering supportive resources for those affected by the tornado, with an emphasis on emotional well-being. For assistance, call (615) 460-4004.
    • Trauma specialist Shaine Malek, a Licensed Professional Counselor-Mental Health Service Provider, is offering Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing therapy for those impacted to help them navigate emotion following the natural disaster. For information, call (615) 474-9012 or email malek.lpcmhsp@gmail.com.
    • Alive Hospice is offering free counseling and grief support for anyone affected by the tornado. Treatment is available for all ages. Please call (615) 963-4732.
    • Daystar Counseling Ministries is offering support for high school kids needing a safe place to process; free to families impacted by the storm. For information, call (615) 298-5353.
    • Disaster Distress Helpline is a national hotline dedicated to providing immediate crisis counseling for people who are experiencing emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster. For information, call (1-800) 985-5990.
    • Nashville CARES is offering pro bono, brief intervention for anyone directly affected by the storms; treatment approaches to include brainspotting and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing therapy. Business hours are from 8 to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. For information, (615) 921-0284.
    • Nashville 2020 Tornado Crisis Support is offering pro bono therapy provided by mostly private practice therapists. Click this link to choose a therapist of your choice and see open appointment times.
    • Safe Haven Trauma Services is offering pro bono crisis response; support groups for children and adults; with limited spots available for individual therapy. For information, (615) 241-6130.
    • Onsite Foundation is offering pro bono crisis support and grief counseling services for anyone affected. For information, call (615) 323-3191.
    • Metro Nashville’s Behavioral Health and Wellness Services include a crisis support center and mobile unit. For more information, click here.
    • National Alliance on Mental Illness of Middle Tennessee.
    • YWCA Nashville’s Domestic Violence Crisis and Support text line (available 24/7): 615-983-5170.

Insurance and FEMA claims

  • If you have not registered with FEMA for tornado damage from the March 3 tornado, a 60 day extension is being offered after May 4 to those who are interested in applying late. Reasoning will need to be provided for why you need the extension. Call FEMA at 1-800-621-3362.

  • Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance mobile claims units with insurance carriers will be available at the Nashville Centennial Sportsplex, Lebanon: Wilson County EMA, and Putnam County 911 Center.
  • If your home or property was affected by the storms and you live in Davidson, Putnam, and Wilson counties, you can register with FEMA the following ways:
    1. Apply online.
    2. Call the registration phone number at 1-800-621-3362; those who have a speech disability or hearing loss and use TTY should call 1-800-462-7585 directly; for those who use 711 or Video Relay Service, call 1-800-621-3362.

Nonprofit and Small Business Resources:

  • Gabbyville Virtual Receptionist Services is a local business founded by Nisha Goyal-Parikh. She has a team of warm and friendly virtual receptionists offering free services to local businesses in need. Their virtual receptionists can answer calls, take messages, schedule appointments, and place outbound calls on your behalf remotely.  If you are a local business owner who would like more information and assistance, please call the Gabbyville customer service line at (800) 903-7141, email nisha.parikh@gabbyville.com, or visit gabbyville.com to live chat with a service representative.
  • The Nashville Camber of Commerce has created a comprehensive list of resources related to preparing and responding to COVID-19. For information, click here.
  • The U.S. Chamber Foundation is offering disaster recovery experts to support to local businesses. Please call (202) 463-5518 for information.
  • Resilience in a Box is a resource guide based on best practices designed to help educate business leaders on disaster preparedness and business resilience.
  • Disaster Recovery Quick Guides and Shell have partnered to provide tailored tips for small businesses looking to prepare and recover.
  • The US Small Business Administration offers four ways to stay updated on SBA COVID-19 resources:

Pet Services

  • The Nashville Humane Association has supplies and resources available including crates, food, blankets, leashes, collars and other basic supplies at their headquarters at 213 Oceola Avenue near the intersection of White Bridge Road and Charlotte Pike.

Shelter and Housing

  • Athena Hospitality Group is offering hotels at a discounted rate in Nashville and Franklin for displaced residents, volunteers, or relief crews in need of hotel rooms. For information, email b.behrens@athenahospitalitygroup.com.
  • Towers at Due West is offering hotel-style bedrooms for short term residents affected by the tornado and those experiencing homelessness. To make reservations, contact Charles Parker at (615) 478-8717 or chazp0719@gmail.com.

Shower and Laundry Services

  • Tide Loads of Hope will be distributing relief supplies throughout affected areas, and will collect laundry from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, March 8 or until reach capacity at Kroger, 800 Monroe Street Nashville, TN 37208. For the most up-to-date truck info, please visit the website: http://spr.ly/61831qHWU.
  • Shower the People is currently running a limited mobile shower route. For information and scheduling, email info@showerthepeople.net.

Transportation

  • Freebird is partnering with Hands On Nashville to offer $10 cash back on your Uber or Lyft ride to a volunteer site.Download the Freebird app for free here, set up your account and the promo code, HONASHVILLE* will automatically appear in your account. When ready to head to a volunteer site, TAP on your $10 ride voucher card and order your Uber or Lyft through the Freebird app. *Promo code HONASHVILLE is good for new users only. Terms apply. Current Freebird users see below for your code offer.Current users: Using your Freebird app, just tap the menu icon on the top left part of the screen (looks like a hamburger). Next, tap on the Promo Codes section. On this screen, you can enter the code HONASHFB. Terms apply.If you volunteer more than once, you will also receive a second bonus voucher which will allow you to earn 500 points for four additional rides to volunteer sites. Every 5,000 points earned in the Freebird app is worth a $10 reward.

PUBLIC ALERT: Tornado Recovery Volunteer Park-and-Ride Shuttles

This following is a press release from the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County.

Metro Nashville is asking for recovery volunteers to help keep damaged neighborhoods accessible to first responders

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – (March 7, 2020) Please, first responders and repair crews need your help.

Continued traffic congestion in the most heavily impacted areas of Nashville will hamper the continued recovery process for those dealing with the most damage.

The Nashville Office of Emergency Management in partnership with Metro Nashville Police and Metro Nashville Public Schools is launching a park-and-ride service on March 8 for tornado recovery volunteers to help them reach the areas of greatest need in North Nashville and East Nashville.

Tornado recovery volunteers should plan to park at Nissan Stadium located at 1 Titans Way, Nashville, TN 37213.

Independent volunteers should park in Lot “R” of Nissan Stadium. Lot “R” is designated as the two parking lots at the bottom of the pedestrian bridge next to Nissan Stadium.

Volunteers working with Hands on Nashville should continue to use parking lots G, M, A, B and D based on where their opportunity states.

Shuttles will transport tornado recovery volunteers from Lot “R” to the areas of greatest need beginning at 9:00 am and shuttles will run continuously until 6:00 pm.

Shuttles will drop off tornado recovery volunteers at the following locations:

 

North Nashville:

21st Avenue North and Scovel Street 14th Avenue North and Cockrill Street

East Nashville:

Fatherland Street and 11th Street 16th Street and Russell Street.

Volunteers working with Hands on Nashville should continue to use parking lots G, M, A, B and D.

Due to the debris in areas of Nashville, private vehicles will not be allowed to access certain neighborhoods.

Shuttles will transport volunteers into these areas that are inaccessible to the general public.

The number of private vehicles in the most impacted areas of the city has hampered entry for large commercial vehicles including Metro Nashville Public Works trucks, Metro Nashville Water Services crews and NES repair trucks.

Motorists should look for electronic message boards as they approach Nissan Stadium for directions to parking lot “R”.

Metro’s Community Hotline will continue to be staffed 24 hours a day and can be reached by calling (615) 862-8750 for all non-emergency, weather-related inquiries, the reporting of hazards and to request assistance. In case of an emergency, residents should call 911.

The NERVE (Nashville Emergency Response Viewing Engine) has been activated in coordination with this EOC activation. This site will provide information about storm related road closures, any evacuation areas or routes, shelters and relief centers. This also includes a media tab with a Twitter feed and press releases.

Volunteers signed up for the following projects should meet at Nissan Stadium to catch a shuttle to their project location:

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