Tag Archives: corporate volunteerism

Announcing the 2019 Strobel Award finalists

Congratulations to the amazing volunteers nominated for the 2019 Mary Catherine Strobel Volunteer Awards. Read on for a list of nominees. Finalist names are bold.

Save the date for the award ceremony: Join Hands On Nashville on Tuesday, April 30, to celebrate volunteerism in our community.

Capacity-building Volunteer

Honors individuals who provide significant operational or administrative support to a nonprofit agency, faith-based ministry or community organization, or developed an innovative approach to significantly improve an existing program.

  • Bruce Skidmore
  • Carol McCrary
  • Claressa Ham
  • Dr. Vincent Couden
  • Falon Ecker
  • Jan Routon
  • Janet Kuhn
  • John Algee
  • Joseph Nault
  • Kay Kretsch
  • Kristie Young
  • Laneisha Coburn
  • Laura Musgrave
  • Lily Hensiek
  • Lisa Booker
  • Mostly Tomatos
  • Rita Pirkl
  • Rose Pink
  • Sally Wright
  • Timothy and Riley Dilks

Civic Volunteer Group

Honors volunteer teams that unite in support of a specific issue or cause.

  • Academy for G.O.D.
  • Baila Studio Moms
  • Belmont University, College of Pharmacy
  • Cross Point Church
  • Episcopal School of Nashville
  • Friends of MACC
  • Joy in Learning
  • Musicians on Call
  • Rotary Club of Nashville
  • Shipwreck Cove Restaurant
  • St. Ann’s Church, Knights of Columbus Chapter
  • Team Emma
  • Tennessee School for the Blind
  • The Contributor, Inc., Volunteer Team
  • The General Sessions Music City Community Court
  • The Physical and Mental Health Committee, Minerva Foundation, Inc.
  • Top Ladies of Distinction, Nashville Capitol City Chapter
  • Women of Covenant Baptist Church

Corporate Volunteerism

Commends group or individual corporate volunteers who exhibit robust
commitments to service as part of their company’s community service program.

  • Apex Moving and Storage
  • BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee
  • Bridgestone Americas
  • Change Healthcare
  • Cigna-HealthSpring
  • Covance Inc.
  • Crain Construction
  • Golden Rule Construction
  • Hawkins Partners, Inc.
  • LifePoint Health
  • Magpies
  • naviHealth
  • Postmates
  • Uncle Classic Barbershop

Direct Service

Applauds volunteers of all ages who participate in hands-on, direct service with a nonprofit agency, faith-based ministry, or community organization.

Ages 5 to 20

  • Anne Slosky
  • Davis Blankenship
  • Ella Delevante
  • Joe Stevens
  • Katie Schmidt
  • Madison Everett
  • Melissa Farrow
  • Nashville Youth For Christ
  • Prim Wiphatphumiprates
  • Raul Solis
  • Saiche Stefanski
  • Sarah Matthews
  • Shannon Flahaven
  • Stephanie McDaniel
  • Sydnee Floyd

Ages 21 to 49

  • Amanda Castle
  • Ashley Leaphart
  • Caitlin Thorsen
  • Corrie Anderson
  • Dawn Warner
  • Emi Canahuati
  • Estella Pan
  • Gina Strickland
  • Henry Rothenberg
  • Jeni Bradley
  • Jennifer Morrison
  • Josh Renner
  • Jurrell Casey
  • Laneisha Coburn
  • Linda Copeland
  • Lindsay Bryant
  • Lindsay Voigt
  • Marc Pearson
  • Meredith Beck
  • Neal Carpenter
  • Shaunte Dozier
  • Talisha Birdsong
  • Tiffany Hodge

Ages 50+

  • Andy Albright
  • Ann Strebler
  • Becky Waldrop
  • Bernice Karnett
  • Beverly Waldrep
  • Charles Black
  • Donice Kaufman Stewart
  • Eileen Wollam
  • Ethel Hollis
  • Frances Casey
  • Gwen Neal
  • Heidi Garber
  • Janelle Wilson
  • Jo Ann Hendrix
  • Joe Manners
  • John Baroni
  • John Bull
  • Judy Bayer
  • Karen Connolly
  • Karen Lyons
  • Kate Ezell
  • Keith Loftis
  • Kim France
  • Marilyn Bagford
  • Mark Patterson
  • Marva Southall
  • Mary Lee Thompson
  • Michael Gray
  • Monty Thomas
  • Pat McDonald
  • Rich Moore
  • Robert Ramsey
  • Susan Gardner
  • Tony Washington
  • Trish McGarty
  • Wanda Smith

 

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‘Pursue Purpose’: A culture of giving back at Change Healthcare

American workers have spoken: It’s the job perks — like company culture, paid time off, and chances to serve the community — that employees are finding increasingly valuable.

But Jonny Woo doesn’t need a study to tell him that. Woo, a Regional Volunteer Chair at Change Healthcare, has completed around 10 corporate service projects since joining the company two years ago.

“I actually think giving back makes me a higher performer,” Woo says. “It’s a really good way for me to get my work done and it’s a good way for me to meet people in the company.”

This year, Woo led a team for the Nashville Heart Walk. He recruited participants, put up flyers, and solicited donations. The team raised more than $150,000 for the Nashville Chapter of the American Heart Association.

“What’s so great about AHA is that all those funds are going back directly into the community to support research and healthcare for those that have been affected by cardiovascular disease in Nashville,” says Ashley Bostic, Change Healthcare’s Director of Culture and Community Giving.

Bostic echoes Woo’s excitement about Change Healthcare’s commitment to a culture of service and giving. She says a guiding light to community giving at Change Healthcare is one of their core values, Pursue Purpose. As the value states, Change Healthcare is here to make healthcare work better. The opportunity to help improve a person’s life propels them forward.

“Focusing on improving a person’s life in any way, shape, or form in our communities is really the foundation of our community-giving programs,” Bostic says. That means encouraging employees to use their paid volunteer hours to support local nonprofits, she says, but it also means giving Change Healthcare employees space to share their passions and concerns with their colleagues and build awareness-raising campaigns around those concerns.

“You’re helping improve others’ lives and we want to make it as easy as possible for you to do that,” Bostic says. Since July of this year, Change Healthcare’s employees have logged more than 5,000 volunteer hours nationwide.

Volunteers from Change Healthcare worked with Hands On Nashville in 2018 to code and organize medical supplies for Project Cure; stain tables and benches for an outdoor classroom at Rosebank Elementary; pack snacks and hygiene kits for those served by the Jean Crowe Advocacy Center; and tend the garden at FASHA Urban Farm.  Most recently, Change Healthcare volunteers sorted gift bags for the Salvation Army Angel Tree.

“Our teams are more connected following those volunteer events,” Bostic says.

If your company is interested in partnering with Hands On Nashville to help support the community, let us know!

Horses and Healing: The Story of Hillenglade

In September, Hands On Nashville partnered with the Home Depot Foundation and Points of Light to implement facility upgrades and improvements for Hope and Healing at Hillenglade. More than 220 volunteers tackled projects that included building children’s playhouses, screening in porches, building office and recreational spaces, landscaping, building benches and picnic tables, and more. The work done will allow Hillenglade to offer year-round programming and increase the number of veterans its services can reach. To view more pictures of the project, click here

 

Jennifer O’Neil has always loved horses.

“God was in a good mood when he made a horse,” said the 70-year-old actress, model, and director, who has spent much of her life training and showing horses. “They’re so amazing and sensitive for such a giant animal.”

Jennifer O'Neill

In 2009, O’Neill bought Hillenglade, a 7-acre farm in north Nashville, and founded Hope and Healing at Hillenglade. HHH is an equine-assisted program that helps veterans and their families reconnect to heal the emotional wounds sustained during combat.

“What happens in the magic of equine therapy is, it’s all about creating relationship, communication, responsibility, and partnering with that animal,” O’Neill said. She said that horses mirror the emotions they see in people. To gain a horse’s trust, a person must put forth a calm confidence in a way that sets the horse at ease — that it’s not about dominating the animal.

“Depending on what you’re carrying when you come in there — be it anger, or rage, or shyness, or a lack of ability to communicate — they’ll size that up,” O’Neill said. She said it’s a powerful moment when someone who is working through their own anger or fear has a breakthrough with a horse.

Since 2010, HHH has served more than 4,000 military and first-responders and their families.

“The whole family unit often bears the brunt of the warriors’ experiences,” O’Neill said, recalling her own experiences in a family affected by post-combat PTSD.

O’Neill’s father served as a pilot during World War II. His plane was shot down and he was held in a German prison camp for two and a half years. He suffered lingering effects from the plane crash and aftermath that O’Neill believes would have been diagnosed as PTSD if the disorder, which wasn’t officially recognized until 1980, had been understood at the time.

As O’Neill has overseen the evolution of Hillenglade, she’s been driven by a desire to build an atmosphere of respite and peace for those who have sacrificed so much.

“I feel firmly that we in the private sector have to stand up and honor and help our veterans and our warriors and our heroes and their families in any way we can,” O’Neill said.

A Benefit for Hope and Healing at Hillenglade 

What: A fundraiser for HHH, featuring The Righteous Brothers, Kathie Lee Gifford, and Nate Sallie

When: Saturday, Nov. 3, beginning at 5:45 p.m.

Where: Franklin Theatre

Tickets: http://www.hillenglade.org

 

 

 

HONDay 2018 brings together nearly 1,000 volunteers for school improvement projects

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Dr. Kimberly Fowler, principal at Hickman Elementary School, addresses the group of volunteers as Hands On Nashville Day 2018 kicks off on Saturday, Sept. 22.

Nearly 1,000 volunteers came together on Saturday, Sept. 22, for the 27th Annual Hands On Nashville Day, a citywide day of service supporting Metro Nashville Public Schools. At 15 schools, volunteers created inspirational murals, landscaped playgrounds and school gardens, painted hallways and gymnasiums, and more.

“The volunteers out here today are showing how much they support MNPS students and families,” said Dr. Kimberly Fowler, principal of Hickman Elementary School. “Their efforts are about more than a coat of paint or a wheelbarrow of mulch. They’re spending their time to show just how important our schools and our children are to the whole community.”

Continue reading HONDay 2018 brings together nearly 1,000 volunteers for school improvement projects

GEODIS and McMurray Middle School: Partners on HON Day and Beyond

Social responsibility is part of the culture at GEODIS. It’s not unusual to find the company’s Nashville office collecting donations of food, clothing and other supplies to benefit local schools – in particular, McMurray Middle School.

HON 2011 1.jpg
 HON Day 2011

In 2011, a group of GEODIS employees spent Hands On Nashville Day volunteering at McMurray Middle School. From that day forward, a partnership grew between GEODIS and McMurray. They became PENCIL Partners, with GEODIS employees participating in “Principal for a Day” and other school events, and holding fundraisers to benefit the school. Around the holidays, GEODIS employees donate specific foods and household items to help serve McMurray families.

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A food and clothing drive at GEODIS

Shayla Holt, Transportation Planner at GEODIS, helps coordinate volunteer events as part of the company’s corporate social responsibility committee (SRC). When it comes to HON Day, “everyone’s always excited about doing something for the school,” she said. “Even with football games going on and other Saturday activities, people look forward to giving their time on HON Day. It encourages people to get involved in other service events, such as food sorting at Second Harvest.”

While GEODIS remains in contact with McMurray Middle School throughout the year, the team has returned to serve on Hands On Nashville Day. “We present it as a family event,” says Holt. “Employees bring their kids to volunteer and enjoy spending time together.”

Holt shared that it’s important for the SRC to be excited and passionate about service in order to motivate employees. While GEODIS makes sure to thank participants after volunteer events, many people simply enjoy knowing they’ve made a difference. “Last year, McMurray teachers volunteered alongside our team on HON Day. Our employees interacted with the principal and teachers, and understood how their work impacted the school,” she said.

This year, McMurray Middle School will be undergoing construction during HON Day. However, Shayla Holt will return to serve as site leader, and the GEODIS SRC is working with Hands On Nashville to find new volunteer opportunities – all while continuing to grow the partnership with McMurray.

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HON Day 2016

Thank you, GEODIS, for your commitment to the Nashville community!

 

Learn more about employee volunteerism with Hands On Nashville.

Volunteer Spotlight: TiAndrea Watkins

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TiAndrea Watkins (left) volunteering with her colleagues at Kirkpatrick Community Center, a place with special significance for her.

Before Hands On Nashville partnered with Change Healthcare volunteers to install acoustic paneling in the Kirkpatrick Community Center gymnasium in April, the reverberating noise level often became so loud it limited the programming and activities in the space.

Games became difficult to follow. Conversations and coaching lessons were strained.

Volunteer TiAndrea Watkins, who volunteered that day in April, knew all too well how the volume affected the programming –thats because she is also a dedicated coach at the center.

TiAndrea is part of a team of ten Change Healthcare employees and family members who spent a Tuesday afternoon working to improve the acoustics of the space, which she says has made a significant difference.

After the project wrapped up, we caught up with TiAndrea about what the center means to her, her memories of visiting the center as a child, and her experience supporting Kirkpatrick as a coach and a volunteer. Continue reading Volunteer Spotlight: TiAndrea Watkins

Guest Blog: TechnologyAdvice Volunteer Recap

Hands On Nashville is fortunate to work with inspired corporate groups looking to make a difference. Recently, TechnologyAdvice Media Relations Coordinator Jenna Elkins sent us this great recap of the volunteer efforts her team has led this year!

Giving is Ingrained in our Company Culture

At TechnologyAdvice, we are committed to serving the Nashville area, along with the people and local businesses that have helped us thrive. In fact, we’ve centered our entire company culture around giving – giving our all to our clients, our employees, and our community.

As of January 2015, we’ve ramped up our volunteer efforts in order to better serve our community and benefit our employees. Studies show that a culture of giving at the workplace enhances moods, encourages teamwork, and keeps employee churn low. As a small but rapidly growing business, volunteering allows us to build positive community relations by serving people from all walks of life and assisting with environmental projects that better our surrounding area.

Through the Hands On Nashville volunteer platform, we’ve connected with unique, and rewarding volunteer projects. It’s a simple system that allows us to seamlessly sign up team members for various activities. We’ve had wonderful experiences, and are looking forward to more!

Tree Planting with Hands On Nashville 

TATreePlanting
Technology/Advice team planting trees with Hands On Nashville in March.

In March, a large group from TechnologyAdvice worked together to support Hands On Nashville in their efforts to plant more trees for a healthier city. Volunteers worked in a riparian zone in north Nashville, and around 200 trees were planted in just two hours! Cameron Graham, TechnologyAdvice Managing Editor, shares his tree planting experience:

“After we arrived on site we received a short, informative presentation about the importance of riparian zones and their effect in controlling run-off waters. Nashville has previously seen intense flooding in some areas, so these zones are crucial for ensuring that excess water can safely be absorbed into the ground.

Once we had been oriented and shown the proper techniques, we picked up our shovels and started planting. To ensure that each tree had a chance to successfully grow, we had to space them correctly and carefully cover them with soil. Everyone on the team had fun digging holes  and searching for areas which needed additional trees. During the event some of our team members also found a variety of wildlife.

Our team enjoyed the activity so much in fact that we finished well ahead of schedule. That gave us time to help collect some errant litter, and grab a few snacks after our hard work. While it might be a little while until we see the results of our efforts, the entire team had a great time actively contributing to the community and the Nashville ecosystem.”

Below are a few more experiences TechnologyAdvice has had through Hands On Nashville since January 2015:

TAHopeLodge
TechnologyAdvice team volunteering at American Cancer Society’s Hope Lodge in spring 2015.

Hope Lodge Game Night – American Cancer Society: Nine of our team members shared in some fun with the residents of the American Cancer Society’s Hope Lodge by playing rounds of bingo. Hope Lodge provides free temporary housing for cancer patients receiving outpatient treatment at Nashville hospitals.

TANFP
Technology/Advice team helping at The Nashville Food Project in spring 2015.

Meal Prep at The Nashville Food Project: Our team was feeling like iron chefs during this activity. We helped process donated and grown produce for the Nashville Food Project’s hot meal program. Our 11 volunteers chopped butternut squash, peeled sweet potatoes, made quesadillas, and more. We used many ingredients to make delicious hot meals for people experiencing homelessness and poverty.

TAProjectCURE
Technology/Advice team at Project C.U.R.E.

Project C.U.R.E: Fourteen of our team members supported Project C.U.R.E., which collects new, surplus, and overstock medical supplies. We sorted all kinds of different medical supplies, and packed them in boxes, which were delivered to one of Project C.U.R.E’s targeted, developing countries.


Learn more about Hands On Nashville’s Corporate Partner Program:
Interested in a customized, team building opportunity to give back with your staff?
Contact tara@hon.org.
Share your story:
Want to share a volunteer experience with us? Let us know at contactus@hon.org.

 

Hands On Nashville Named an MNPS Academy Partner of the Year

MNPS Academies 2015
Hands On Nashville received the award for Academy Partnership of the Year: Engineering, Manufacturing, and Industrial Technology for its partnership with Glencliff High School at the 2015 Academies of Nashville Awards.

For the last five years, Hands On Nashville has worked to engage and advance the Academy of Environmental and Urban Planning at Glencliff High School.

On Monday, May 18, the partnership was recognized as Academy Partnership of the Year: Engineering, Manufacturing, and Industrial Technology during the 2015 Academies of Nashville Awards! Continue reading Hands On Nashville Named an MNPS Academy Partner of the Year

Nominations Now Open for 2014 Strobel Volunteer Awards

Hands On Nashville Asks Community To Nominate Volunteer Heroes by Feb. 14

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 27, 2014

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Hands On Nashville is asking the community to nominate individuals and groups for the 2014 Mary Catherine Strobel Volunteer Awards presented by HCA/TriStar Health.

“We all know incredible people – everyday heroes – who give of their time and talents to make our community better,” said Brian Williams, Hands On Nashville president and CEO. “Each spring, the Strobel Awards luncheon gives our community an opportunity to lift up these inspiring stories of volunteerism that happen around us every day.”

Strobel2014ForSite

The nomination deadline is Feb. 14, and nomination forms can be found at www.HON.org/strobel_awards. Nashvillians are encouraged to nominate outstanding volunteers within six categories of service:

  • Civic Volunteer Group Award recognizes representatives of civic, membership, faith-based or noncorporate groups that volunteer together for a specific cause or issue.
  • Capacity-building Volunteer Award honors individuals who provide significant operational or administrative support to a nonprofit agency, faith-based ministry or community organization.
  • Corporate Volunteerism Award pays tribute to businesses that have robust employee volunteer programs with high levels of participation and impact.
  • Direct Service Volunteer Award recognizes individuals who have participated in hands-on, direct service with a nonprofit agency, faith-based ministry or community organization.
  • Volunteer Innovator Award honors individuals or groups that have directly identified a community need and responded to it by developing and implementing an innovative solution, or improved an existing program or effort through creative problem-solving.
  • Youth Volunteer Award recognizes youth, teens and young adults ages 5 to 22 who have gone above and beyond to incorporate volunteerism into their lives.

Three finalists for five of the six categories will be selected by two groups of independent assessors, composed of community volunteers, volunteer administrators, business leaders and civic leaders. The exception is the Volunteer Innovator Award category. Finalists in this category will be selected by a panel of judges convened by TN Media. To encourage broad community participation, volunteers in this category will be invited to vote for an award recipient via the Tennessean.com website.  All award recipients will be announced at the luncheon.

The Awards luncheon, now in its 28th year, will be held on April 22 at the Marriott Cool Springs Conference Center. All nominees receive special recognition and a complimentary seat at the luncheon.

More than 700 volunteers and agency representatives are expected to attend the luncheon. Award luncheon tickets will be available for purchase at HON.org in March.

About the Mary Catherine Strobel Volunteer Awards
The Mary Catherine Strobel Volunteer Awards are named in memory of the late Mary Catherine Strobel, known for her extensive and charitable efforts toward improving the lives of Middle Tennessee’s homeless, impoverished and less fortunate populations. The annual awards ceremony celebrates Strobel’s service and recognizes those who continue her legacy.

About Hands On Nashville
Since 1991, Hands On Nashville has been connecting volunteers to critical needs facing the Middle Tennessee community, such as hunger, homelessness and environmental protection. Offering more than 400 volunteer opportunities to the community each month at HON.org, Hands On Nashville challenges everyone to find a way to give back and to … Be the Change. Volunteer.

Media Contact: 
Becca Wilson
becca@hon.org
(615) 298-1108 Ext. 406

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Mayor Karl Dean Encourages Businesses To Get Involved

Thanks to Nashville Mayor Karl Dean for his column in today’s Tennessean about ways businesses can get involved in volunteerism – including Hands On Nashville Day and the Mayor’s Workplace Challenge! Read the mayor’s column here.

HANDS ON NASHVILLE DAY
If your business or organization is interested in signing up for Hands On Nashville Day (coming up this Saturday, Sept. 22!), check out this page with all the info you need to know.

MAYOR’S WORKPLACE CHALLENGE
This is one of the coolest things about our city – individuals and organizations coming together to make our community a better place for all. And the Mayor’s Workplace Challenge aims to achieve that in three categories: 1) Involved (volunteerism); 2) Green (sustainability); and 3) Healthy (this pretty much says it!)

Read more about the Mayor’s Workplace Challenge. And ask your boss if your company is participating.

Also, here’s a great upcoming opportunity for businesses to learn more about the “Involved” portion of the Challenge on Thursday, Oct. 18 at Hands On Nashville’s office:

Mayor’s Workplace Challenge: “Involved” Lunch & Learn
Thursday, Oct. 18, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Hosted by KPMG and Hands On Nashville

Representatives of Nashville businesses and organizations are invited to a Lunch & Learn hosted by KPMG and Hands On Nashville to find out how to participate in the Mayor’s Workplace Challenge. Hear from representatives who have taken the challenge and learn how your business can get recognized by Mayor Dean for its civic involvement. Complimentary lunch will be provided by KPMG. RSVP by emailing Allison@hon.org.