Tag Archives: Volunteerism

Congratulations to the 2021 Strobel Volunteer Awards nominees!

2020 was a year like no other, full of incredible acts of service in response to multiple disasters and great community need. Thank you to the amazing volunteers nominated for the 35th Annual Mary Catherine Strobel Volunteer Awards. Read on for a full list of nominees in each category.

What’s next: We’ll announce the finalists on June 1, and the public will be able to vote for their favorite stories of service between June 1-15.

Save the date for the celebration: Join Hands On Nashville on Thursday, July 1, when we’ll announce the award recipients on our website and social channels. Sign up for our newsletter so you don’t miss any important announcements!

Capacity-building Volunteer 

Recognizes individuals who provided significant operational or administrative support in 2020 to a nonprofit agency, faith-based ministry or community organization, or developed an innovative approach to significantly improve an existing program.

  • Jena Altstatt 
  • Corrie Anderson 
  • Colin Dudley and the team at CGI 
  • Julia Eidt 
  • Linda Emerson 
  • Lindsay Harte 
  • Suzanne Hartness 
  • Micah Lacher 
  • Chimen Mayi 
  • Dianne McNeese 
  • Dr. Paula Pendergrass 
  • Allison Quintanilla Plattsmier 
  • Sunny Spyridon 
  • Turnip Green Creative Reuse
  • Charlie Tygard 
  • Julie Williams 
  • Jesse Wilmoth 

Group Volunteer Service 

Recognizes any group of two or more individuals who volunteered together in 2020 for a specific issue or cause. Some group examples are faith-based, civic, membership, and corporate.   

  • 100 Black Men of Middle Tennessee 
  • Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., Kappa Lambda Omega Chapter 
  • Bell Garden Chicken Tenders  
  • The Bridge Builder Program  
  • Caterpillar Financial 
  • Charlotte Heights Church of Christ volunteer group 
  • Cheatham Place Volunteers 
  • Designed Conveyor Systems 
  • Encompass Health Hospice 
  • Exotic Avian Sanctuary of Tennessee volunteers 
  • FreeStore Volunteers 
  • Katie and Eric Hogue 
  • International Coaching Federation Tennessee Chapter 
  • Jackson National Life Insurance Company 
  • Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church 
  • Junior League Nashville 
  • Savannah McBride and Kara Weller 
  • Trish Marshall and Michel Magnin 
  • McGavock Coalition 
  • Nashville Diaper Connection’s Friday Crew 
  • Nashville First Baptist Church  
  • Open Table Nashville’s Winter Canvassing Team 
  • The Progressive Group Of Insurance Companies 
  • Rotary Clubs of Murfreesboro (Murfreesboro Noon Rotary, Murfreesboro Breakfast Rotary, and Smyrna Rotary) 
  • The Students of CiViL 
  • Tennessee Scenic Rivers Association (TSRA) 
  • Tony, Lisa, Kyle, Brittany and Wake Tate 
  • Top Buttons Nashville 
  • Williamson Social Justice Alliance Vulnerable Families   

Disaster Relief Volunteer 

Recognizes those who made a significant contribution to helping Nashville recover from the tornado, pandemic, or bombing in 2020. 

  • Maria Amado 
  • Karen Brown 
  • Daniel Craig 
  • David Flow 
  • Stephie Goings 
  • Howard’s Crew 
  • Joany Johnson 
  • Debbie Linn 
  • Cindy Manley 
  • Nashville Noticias Volunteer Group 
  • Nashville Office of Emergency Management Emergency Support Unit 
  • Ben Piñon 
  • Nicholas Renfroe 
  • Madison Thorn 
  • The Blessing Wave  
  • Charlotte E. Thomas West 
  • Marissa Wynn 

Social Justice Impact Volunteer

Recognizes individuals whose volunteer work in 2020 was centered on dismantling or calling out systemic injustice or oppression and lifting up disenfranchised communities.  

  • Tony Armani 
  • Jackie Arnold 
  • Mary Avent 
  • Ishika Devgan 
  • Calea Davis 
  • Stacy Downey
  • The Equity Alliance
  • Jasmine Symone Franklin 
  • Mary Langford 
  • Greta McClain 
  • Makayla N McCree 
  • Meredith McKinney 
  • Nashville Anti-Human Trafficking Coalition 
  • Donna Pack 
  • Kimberly Pointer 
  • Keenan Robinson 
  • Serving Souls NGO 
  • Kenneth Stewart 
  • Parangkush Subedi 
  • Richard “Dick” Tennent 

Direct Service Volunteer — Youth  

Recognizes individuals who contributed significant volunteer time, energy, and/or resources in 2020 to help the community. Volunteers ages 5-20 are eligible for this award.  

  • Hannah Bodoh 
  • Laura Enciso 
  • Sydnee Floyd 
  • Ian Hooper 
  • Violet Melendez 
  • Savannah Nimitz 
  • Emini Offutt 
  • Rachel Siciliano 
  • Darrell Walker 

Direct Service Volunteer — Adult 

Recognizes individuals who contributed significant volunteer time, energy, and/or resources in 2020 to help the community. Volunteers ages 21-49 are eligible for this award.  

  • Melissa Alexander 
  • Nadia Ali 
  • Maria Amado 
  • Sandra Amstutz 
  • Jessica Azor 
  • Ryan Bailey 
  • Michael Taylor Bick 
  • Deanna Bowman 
  • Anita Cochran 
  • Abishai Collingsworth  
  • Becky Conway 
  • Natalie Dillard 
  • Angela Ellis
  • Teaka Jackson 
  • Jason King 
  • Emily Ladyman 
  • Cameron Mahone 
  • Laneisha Matthews 
  • Jami Oakley 
  • Elizabeth Graham Pistole 
  • Samantha Pita 
  • Allison Quintanilla Plattsmier 
  • Laura Prechel  
  • Savanna Starko 
  • Natalie Thompson 
  • Vibhav Veldore 
  • Kenya Watkins 
  • Eric Werner 
  • Erica Williams 

Direct Service Volunteer — Older Adult

Recognizes individuals who contributed significant volunteer time, energy, and/or resources in 2020 to help the community. Volunteers ages 50 and up are eligible for this award. 

  • Dennis Caffrey 
  • Bobby Cain 
  • Melissa Callaway 
  • Mrs. Joan Campbell 
  • Gil Chilton 
  • Mary Lou Durham 
  • Tony Eagen 
  • Kathy Felts 
  • Elois Freeman 
  • Michael Gray 
  • Walt Grooms 
  • Kathy Halbrooks 
  • Donna Hasty 
  • Hans-Willi Honegger 
  • Eva Ledezma Jimenez 
  • Barbara Kaye 
  • Stephen Kohl 
  • Victor Legerton 
  • Kathryn L. Mitchem 
  • Michelle Putnam 
  • Andreas Ritchie 
  • Dr. Ellen K. Slicker 
  • Kim Tierney
  • Tom Wallace 

Happy National Volunteer Week!

It’s National Volunteer Week! And while Hands On Nashville celebrates volunteers every day of the year, we want to mark this occasion by sharing a very special and sincere THANK YOU with the volunteers who have given so much of themselves to help their neighbors.

“We are living in a moment that calls for hope and light and love.  Hope for our futures, light to see our way forward, and love for one another.  Volunteers provide all three.  Service — the act of looking out for one another — is part of who we are as a Nation.  Our commitment to service reflects our understanding that we can best meet our challenges when we join together.  This week, we recognize the enduring contributions of our Nation’s volunteers and encourage more Americans to join their ranks.”

Read more from the Presidential Proclamation on National Volunteer Week 2021 here.

And visit hon.org to find a volunteer project!

    

Hands On Nashville’s 2020 Impact Report

2020 was a year marked by immense challenges, but also by so many stories of people stepping up and coming together to support their neighbors. Volunteers played a huge part in helping Nashville get through a tough year. We’re honored to share Hands On Nashville’s 2020 Impact Report, which shows the strong and inspiring impact of volunteerism.

If you’d like to receive a PDF copy of this impact report, fill out the form below!

Love and volunteering go hand in hand

“Love in action is service to the world.” Lynne Namka 

For some lucky locals, opening their hearts to service also opened their lives to finding love. Here are just a few of their stories, plus some volunteer opportunities that would be a great way for couples to get to know one another! 

Cara and Carey 

Cara Ince’s love story started when she found a volunteer opportunity in HON’s Hands On Call newsletter in 2010. She found that Nashville International Center for Empowerment was looking for volunteers to teach English as a second language, signed up, and began teaching a class. A few months later, another volunteer named Carey came on as an assistant teacher in her class.  

Cara and Carey

They hit it off and volunteered together at NICE for about two years. They’ve now been married for almost seven years and have two small children. 

“We still always talk about our students and have such fond memories of that time,” Cara says. “It was definitely a cool experience, and a really good way to get to know someone when you’re first starting to date.” 

And while they don’t volunteer as much these days as they used to because they’re busy at home with their two children, they are beginning to talk about ways, once the pandemic is over, they could engage the whole family in volunteering.   

“We want [them] to be appreciative of what we have and also to give back to other people,” Cara says. 

Jordan and Kirsten 

Jordan Fernandes met his future wife Kirsten as a volunteer with The Bridge Ministry, serving groceries and meals to individuals experiencing homelessness. Kirsten had just graduated college and moved back to Nashville when she decided to volunteer with some friends.  

Jordan and Kirsten

“For them it was a one-time visit, but I liked it so much that I came back again and again,” she says. During one of her shifts, while they were unloading a grocery truck, Jordan spotted Kirsten. He introduced himself not long afterwards and the two became friends. Their friendship evolved into dating, and Kirsten says they fell madly in love. 

“Throughout our time getting to know each other, we always knew that we had a guaranteed date every Tuesday night serving the homeless under the Jefferson Street Bridge,” Kirsten says.  

Jordan proposed in 2015 and the couple married in 2016. They’re now expecting their first child. 

“Volunteering played a huge part of our story together, and volunteering in various capacities around Nashville continues to be so important to us,” Kirsten says. “It allows us to share our love beyond just our family to families and individuals throughout Nashville!” 

Ava and Tristan 

Ava Suppelsa was feeling helpless last summer in the wake of a deadly tornado and the pandemic. She wanted to do something tangible to help the many people in the community who were hurting. So Ava, a songwriter, started Hope on the Row, a nonprofit that connects music industry professionals with homelessness relief efforts.  

Ava and Tristan

Her boyfriend Tristan — also a songwriter — was a source of strength and support as she launched the nonprofit. Ava says the two of them grew up in families that emphasized giving back, so they had volunteered together over the course of their two-year relationship. But starting a nonprofit was a whole different ballgame. 

“I didn’t really know exactly how much work I was getting myself into, and I wouldn’t be able to do this without Tristan,” Ava says. “He’s been there with me for every stressful, hard, frustrating, beautiful, and rewarding moment that comes with running and organization like this, and that only brought us closer.” 

Now the organization serves more than 50 people each week, and helps individuals navigate the low-income housing system with a goal of getting as many people off the streets as possible. 

“We’ve both seen each other at our best, truest selves that come out when you’re doing work like this,” Ava says, “and I think I speak for both of us when I say that seeing that makes you fall in love with your partner all over again.” 

Patrick and Patti  

When Patrick Lyons moved to Nashville in 1993, he didn’t know a soul. Then he saw a writeup in the Nashville Scene for Hands On Nashville volunteer orientation. 

“I thought, ‘What a great way to meet people,’” Patrick says. He went to orientation and learned that he could volunteer in the evenings and on weekends, which fit his travel-heavy work schedule.  

Patti and Patrick

One day he volunteered at an event at Cheekwood, taking tickets. That’s when he met Patti, who had also found the volunteer opportunity through HON.  

“We found out more about each other and talked about how hard it is to meet people,” Patti says. “Then he called me up and asked me out.” 

Patti and Patrick quickly realized they both shared a heart for service.  

“I knew he was a good guy because he was volunteering,” Patti says. “We knew we were like-minded people.” 

“It was a pre-screening we didn’t have to do,” Patrick says, laughing.  

Patrick and Patti took their relationship — and their commitment to volunteering — to the next level. Patti became HON’s executive director and Patrick served on HON’s board of directors. While Patrick and the rest of the board reached out to nonprofits to tell them about HON, Patti compiled the volunteer opportunity calendar manually by making phone calls to local organizations, typing up volunteer needs, and making copies of the calendar to distribute around town.  

The couple live in Savannah, Ga., now, but they still believe in the power of giving back — volunteering, delivering meals, mentoring, serving on advisory boards. Patti says she sees HON in the news sometimes and is so proud of how the organization has grown.   

Volunteering through HON is a great way to meet people in a new city, Patrick says. He found love with Patti, but he also made lifelong friends.  

“The organization did wonders with putting together like-minded people,” he says. “I’ve probably got seven close friends I’m still in touch with after 26 years.” 

Volunteer opportunities that would be great for dates 

Looking for a way to spend some time with your sweetie over Valentine’s Day? Check out these volunteer opportunities! 

💓 Help fight food insecurity with The Branch of Nashville 

💓 Create Love Your Neighbor Notes with the Community Resource Center 

💓 Garden Prep with Inspiritus 

💓 Organize donations for tornado survivors with Catholic Charities of Tennessee, Inc. 

💓 Plant trees with the Nashville Tree Foundation 

💓 Deliver groceries to seniors with The Store 

💓 Pack food boxes for From Your Father’s “Couples Day of IMPACK” 

City of Nashville & Davidson County join nonprofits to provide response and recovery efforts for historic downtown area

December 31, 2020, Nashville, Tenn. – The Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County, Office of Emergency Management, and Nashville/Davidson County Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD) are working together to provide immediate assistance to individuals affected by the tragedy on Friday, Dec. 25, in downtown Nashville.

With the city’s focus of quickly identifying businesses, employees of those affected businesses, and residents who lived in the damaged historic downtown structures, members of the VOAD have been identified based on their areas of expertise to assist in moving the recovery efforts downtown forward. This group of local nonprofits has been working closely since the incident to organize and mobilize resources and assistance by individuals and families affected.

Available resources include:

January 1st Food and Essentials Drive-Thru Event for Survivors

• 1 p.m., Community Resource Center, 218 Omohundro Place
The Community Resource Center, in partnership with Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee, will be providing essential kits for survivors that will include food, hygiene products and diapers for those in need. The food boxes and essential kits will be available to pick-up during a “Nashville Strong” drive-thru event on Friday, January 1, 2020 at 1:00 pm at the Community Resource Center, located at 218 Omohundro Place, Nashville, TN 37210.

Lutheran Disaster Response will also be on site for emotional and spiritual care providing purposeful listening to survivors overcoming challenges related to disaster recovery.

Additional Resources Available for Survivors

Nashville Strong Assistance Fund
Catholic Charities will provide assistance to those who live or work in the explosion perimeter area in the historic downtown area, through a specially funded program that will begin Monday, Jan. 4. An online application for assistance will be go live on Friday afternoon, Jan. 1.

The application can be accessed from the following web site: nashvillestrong2021.org. Those who are unable to access the online application can call (615) 352-8591.

hubNashville
For assistance from Metro Nashville Davidson County Government, affected individuals should visit hub.nashville.gov, use the hubNashville 311 app or call 311.

Food Assistance
Individuals in need of emergency food assistance can text ‘FEEDS’ to 797979 or
visit www.secondharvestmidtn.org/get-help to access Second Harvest’s Find Food tool to locate the nearest food distribution, including Emergency Food Box sites in Davidson County. For additional assistance, individuals can call 2-1-1.

• Cash Assistance
A limited supply of gift cards, provided by Salvation Army — Nashville Area Command, will be available for immediate cash assistance for those affected. Individuals can receive more information by texting the word ‘STRONG’ to 484848.

Housing and Immediate Needs
The American Red Cross of Tennessee is providing assistance for those displaced from their home, apartment or townhouse. Those needing assistance should contact the Red Cross at 800-RED-CROSS to help with their immediate needs, which may include food, shelter, clothing, health and mental health services, community referrals and recovery assistance.

• Assistance for Spanish Speakers
Spanish speakers affected can call Conexión Americas at (615) 270-9252 for assistance beginning on Monday, Jan. 4, 2021.

Resource and Referral Line
Individuals in need of assistance can contact United Way of Greater Nashville’s 24-hour resource and referral line for help by dialing 211 or visiting 211.org. Note: To qualify for financial assistance, survivors will need to provide proof of employment or residency in the direct impacted area.

How Community Members Can Help

Donate

United Way of Greater Nashville is partnering with Mayor John Cooper’s office to accept gifts to its Restore the Dream Fund which will provide long-term disaster recovery support to nonprofits for the survivors. People who wish to donate may visit www.unitedwaygreaternashville.org or text RESTORE20 to 41444.

• The Salvation Army – Nashville Area Command believes “we are stronger together” and is assisting survivors with urgent needs of food, transportation, and healthcare through Kroger Gift Cards, UBER Rides and UBER Eats. Gifts can be made in support of this disaster response at www.salvationarmynashville.org.

• Catholic Charities, Diocese of Nashville provides a range of services that help clients through crises and toward self-sufficiency. Services include emergency financial assistance, counseling, job training, housing stability, hunger relief, and more. Gifts in support of their disaster relief efforts can be made at www.cctenn.org.

• The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee’s Nashville Neighbors Fund, established in partnership with WTVF-NewsChannel5, is accepting gifts to provide services to both the immediate and long-term needs of survivors affected by the Christmas Day tragedy.

Community Resource Center of Nashville will be actively engaged with long-term recovery efforts to provide basic essentials, clothing, household goods, and is collecting items to assist with debris removal, clean up and first responder needs.

Volunteer

Hands On Nashville is recruiting volunteers to help with disaster relief and recovery efforts, including cleanup and distribution of essential items to survivors and first responders. Visit hon.org to register as a volunteer or find a disaster-relief project.

###

About the Nashville/Davidson County VOAD

The Nashville/Davidson County Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD) provides the framework for successful preparation and activation of nonprofits and private companies to provide essential augmentations for local government’s capacity and available resources during a disaster. The VOAD is a purposeful mechanism that scales up during crisis, strengthens area-wide disaster coordination, and enhances preparedness by sharing information and engaging in joint training.

The current VOAD steering committee includes:

  • American Red Cross of Tennessee
  • Catholic Charities of Tennessee
  • Community Resource Center
  • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee
  • Conexión Americas
  • Hands On Nashville
  • The Housing Fund
  • Lutheran Disaster Response
  • Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce
  • Nashville Humane Association
  • Salvation Army – Nashville Area Command
  • Neighbor to Neighbor
  • Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee
  • United Methodist Committee on Relief – Tennessee Conference
  • United Way of Greater Nashville
  • Urban League of Middle Tennessee

2020 volunteerism by the numbers

In spite of — and because of — all the challenges of 2020, Nashville volunteers made a strong showing in 2020. The numbers below reflect a community that shows up for its neighbors. We are grateful for you. See you in 2021!  

OVERVIEW 

Volunteers who signed up to serve: 52,000+ 

New hon.org volunteer registrations: 34,000+ 

Projects on the calendar: 6,600+ 

Virtual or remote projects: 440+ 

New long-term or flexibly scheduled projects: 160+ 

Economic value volunteers created for community partners: $2.29 million 

SKILLS-BASED AND LONG-TERM SERVICE 

• HON placed 23 AmeriCorps members at 13 local nonprofits for a yearlong term of service. 

• HON’s GeekCause volunteers completed 24 tech projects, which saved our community partners $169,773

EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT 

• The corporate engagement team enlisted 1,265 volunteers who donated 6,100+ hours of their time to support 13 local nonprofits. 

• Several employee teams utilized new at-home and kit-based project models to create 5,000+ care packages for teachers, students, veterans, individuals experiencing homelessness, and seniors. Those at-home projects allowed many to engage their families in their volunteer activities.

DISASTER RESPONSE   

• Individuals who signed up to help with disaster relief: 35,000+ 

• Individuals who volunteered at a disaster-relief project (some many times): 11,200+  

• Disaster-relief projects completed since March: 2,300+ 

‘We still have work to do’: Celebrating the volunteer spirit that powered us through 2020

We kicked off 2020 thinking we’d usher in a spring of commemoration. It had been 10 years since the devastating flood of 2010, during which time thousands of volunteers came together in a show of solidarity and spirit.

But hopes for reflection turned into action, this time in response to the March 3 tornado and COVID-19 pandemic. Again, volunteers showed how absolutely critical they are during disaster response and recovery.

We’re excited to share with you a video that celebrates the spirit of the volunteers helping our community get through this challenging time.

Hands On Nashville is in awe of this community. It’s not easy for folks to give to others while they themselves are hurting. But that’s what Nashvillians do. It’s who we are.

We’re working hard to be ready for the next disaster, and we can’t do it without you. Join us by volunteering or donating.

👋 Volunteer: http://hon.org/membership
🎁 Donate: http://hon.org/donate

Thank you for your support!

Thanks to Adelicia Company for the great partnership this year, and the beautiful videos! Additional thanks to everyone who contributed photos and video clips to help us tell this story.

Five ways to make a difference in 2021

What a year it’s been. It’s hard to imagine what life will look like after such a chaotic and challenging 2020. We know one thing for sure: Nashville’s needs aren’t going away just because the calendar flips over to 2021. Volunteers will still be needed. They’re the gift that keeps on giving to the community all year long.  

So, what can you do? 

Here are five easy ways to make a difference in 2021: 

1. Commit to volunteer 3 hours per month 

It’s so easy through hon.org! Sign up to volunteer with more than 200 local organizations. Fly solo or serve as a family or team, find an in-person or virtual project, enjoy an outdoors project, or even select a project where you can utilize your creative or technical skills.   

2. Donate to empower other volunteers 

Independent Sector says volunteer time is valuable: It’s worth $27.20 per hour! That means volunteers who donate three hours of their time each month are essentially donating $81.80 monthly to the organization they help. So maybe your schedule is packed and there’s no time to volunteer. Can you commit to donate $81.80 each month — the equivalent of three hours of volunteering? Any amount helps HON cultivate active volunteers. Click here to set up your sustaining donation now

3. Give while you shop  

Add Hands On Nashville to your Amazon Smile account. It’s totally free and allows your regularly scheduled shopping to benefit the community automatically. 

4. Use your paid volunteer hours if you have them 

Many companies offer paid time off for their employees to volunteer. Don’t let this benefit go to waste! If your company doesn’t already offer paid volunteer time, ask if that’s something they’d be willing to implement in the future! Or maybe even ask your boss if your colleagues could volunteer as a teambuilding exercise. Need ideas on where to go and what to do? That’s why HON is here! 

5. Like, share, and comment on HON’s social media posts

Every time you engage with one of our posts, it increases our reach on social. And when our reach on social grows, we are able to recruit more volunteers and meet more critical needs in the community. Stop doom scrolling and get inspired! Check us out on TwitterFacebookInstagram, and LinkedIn.

Boosting volunteerism is easy no matter your budget

Did you know that charitable giving is good for your health? At the end of a difficult year, we could all use that immune system boost. The good news is it’s easier than ever spread the love for your favorite organizations no matter what your budget looks like. Here are three super easy ways you can show support for HON and our mission to meet needs through volunteerism: 

1. Set it (a sustaining donation) and forget it  
Don’t get us wrong — one-time donations are fantastic! But did you know you can set up a monthly, quarterly, or annual donation to HON? Sustaining donations help HON plan our budget for maximum impact. No gift is too small — even a $5 sustaining monthly gift makes a big difference to us. 

2. Start a fundraiser on Facebook or Instagram  
There’s power in numbers! Use this link to set up a fundraiser for HON on Facebook. Or, in Instagram stories, go to the sticker menu and select the “donation” icon. Search for “HONashville.” When you post a story with the HON donation sticker, your followers will be able to donate with just a couple of taps!  

3. Like, share, and comment on HON’s social media posts
Every time you engage with one of our posts, it increases our reach on social. And when our reach on social grows, we are able to recruit more volunteers and meet more critical needs in the community. So YES, Virginia, spending all that time on social media really CAN do some good! Check us out on TwitterFacebookInstagram, and LinkedIn.

Hands On Nashville Announces 2020 Strobel Volunteer Award Recipients

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Sept. 17, 2020) – Middle Tennesseans were honored for their volunteerism during Hands On Nashville’s 34th Annual Mary Catherine Strobel Volunteer Awards, presented by Jackson National Life Insurance Co. Recipients were unveiled during a multiday, virtual ceremony, which occurred Sept. 14–16.

The annual event recognizes volunteers for their outstanding contributions to the community, and celebrates the life of Mary Catherine Strobel, a Nashvillian who had an outstanding dedication to service. Winners are typically honored during a luncheon at the Music City Center; however, due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the nonprofit opted to recognize recipients virtually.

“Mary Catherine Strobel was the living embodiment of generosity and service to others,” said Lori Shinton, president and CEO of Hands On Nashville. “In light of the recent events in our community – including the March tornado and pandemic currently impacting our country – it is more important now than ever to honor the amazing volunteers who do Mary Catherine’s legacy proud by giving back.”

Community members submitted 165 nominations for the 2020 Strobel Volunteer Awards.

“This event celebrates the spirit of giving that is so crucial to improving our city,” said Aimee DeCamillo, chief commercial officer and president, Jackson National Life Distributors LLC, the presenting sponsor for the awards. “We are thrilled to take part in such a proud tradition and help recognize all of these volunteers for their incredible dedication, in the hopes that they may inspire the next generation of givers to take up the cause.”

The award recipients are as follows:

  • Sherri Mitchell-Snider – Capacity-building Volunteer Award
  • Chicktime – Civic Volunteer Group Award
  • Creative Artists Agency Nashville – Corporate Volunteerism Award
  • Emily Phan – Direct Service Volunteer Award (Ages 5 to 20)
  • Adam Crookston – Direct Service Volunteer Award (Ages 21 to 49)
  • Claudia Prange – Direct Service Volunteer Award (Ages 50-plus)

###

About the Awards

The Mary Catherine Strobel Volunteer Awards are named in memory of the late Mary Catherine Strobel, known for her extensive and charitable efforts toward improving the lives of Middle Tennessee’s homeless, impoverished and less fortunate populations. The annual awards ceremony celebrates her service and recognizes those who continue her legacy. View all nominees for the 2020 awards.

Photos by Nathan Morgan Photography