Hands On Nashville welcomes Starbucks fellows

Hands On Nashville is excited to welcome David Bradley and MaryBeth Konkowski to the team. David and MaryBeth are part of the Starbucks Foundation Service Fellows Program, a culmination of efforts from Points of Light and The Starbucks Foundation, created to help nonprofits build capacity while giving employees a chance to get more involved in their communities. Through the program, 100 Starbucks employees will serve for six months at agencies in 20 cities across the United States.  

David Bradley

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Why Hands on Nashville? 

I started at Starbucks because it does a lot of secular good, just for the sake of being good. When I found out about the Starbucks Service Fellows program, and looked up Hands On Nashville, it seemed like Starbucks’ mission to do good lined up with HON’s mission.

How do you hope to grow throughout this term of service? 

I would like to increase my knowledge of the nonprofit world in general. I don’t have a nonprofit background; however, I have always been interested in social change and social theory. I’m currently working on a minor in sociology, but rather than just reading theories and understanding why things are wrong, I’d like to be a part of how to make things better.

What is one of your most memorable experiences as a volunteer?

I did a river cleanup with the Cumberland River Compact in Gallatin, Tennessee. We were able to go into the water beds and pull massive amounts of construction waste out of the river. A week later, CRC followed up with us, reporting exactly how much trash we pulled out. It was cool to see the extent of the impact we had on the health of the river.


MaryBeth Konkowski

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Why Hands on Nashville? 

I was really excited when I found out we would be working with Hands On Nashville! I moved here after graduating from college and found it difficult to make friends. HON was an organization that I used to get involved with the community, find volunteer opportunities, and meet some good friends.

How do you hope to grow throughout this term of service?

I was in the corporate world for a while, and it’s always been interesting to me how nonprofits get the funding to do the things they want to do, all while supporting other nonprofits. I’m interested in learning more about the behind-the-scenes of how a nonprofit operates.

What is one of your most memorable experiences as a volunteer?

My mom and dad instilled a heart of service in me at a young age. One of the earliest memories I have of volunteering was being toted along by my mother, who was volunteering at a senior care center near my hometown. I was too young to volunteer, but I remember sitting and listening to these older women talk and tell funny stories. Looking back, I have warm, fuzzy feelings and it makes me realize how spending time at this care center really warmed my heart.

 

Resolve to Serve Stories: Shower The People

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John Sabo has been volunteering with Shower The People for a little over a year.

Every week, John Sabo drives across town and parks next to a big white bus. He packs bags of dirty towels into his car, brings them home, and plans when in his schedule he’ll fit four loads of laundry.

Sabo returns the clean, dried, and folded towels to the team at Shower The People, a nonprofit whose retrofitted retired school bus acts as a mobile shower facility for people experiencing homelessness. Sabo picks up another batch of towels, takes them home, and begins the wash cycle all over again. 

“I think it’s a necessity,” he says. “I might not be able to change the world, but I can change one situation.”   

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Sabo describes homelessness as a “challenging and lonely lifestyle.” His son, who experienced homelessness, died four years ago. To honor his son’s memory, Sabo dedicates time to multiple nonprofits that provide aid to people struggling with hunger and housing instability.

“John has been such an amazing blessing to our organization,” says Meredith MacLeod Jaulin, Shower the People’s Chief Administrator. “Our volunteers understand how much of a difference being clean and taking a shower can be to an individual.” 

Jaulin says those who utilize Shower The People’s mobile facilities often experience a renewed sense of dignity and self-worth. Access to better hygiene can also open doors to job opportunities and housing.

She adds that, without volunteers like Sabo, keeping operations running smoothly would be difficult.  

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Shower The People converted an old school bus into a mobile showering unit to aid people experiencing homelessness.

“My philosophy is that there are some people on the front line, like Shower The

People, that have direct contact with these individuals in need,” Sabo says, “and there are other people behind the scenes to make sure things work so the frontline people can do their jobs.” 

Sabo works closely with Jaulin to coordinate schedules, and between driving, washing, drying, and folding, Sabo gives as many as seven hours of his week to the organization.  

“It’s worth the effort to help other people,” he says. “I would just say look at what you have, then look at what other people don’t have, and see if you can make the world a little bit better place just by helping out.”   

Interested in volunteering with Shower The People? Check out their available volunteer opportunities here.

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Young volunteers pose for a photo after volunteering with Shower The People.

 Photos courtesy of Shower The People.

Check out these family-friendly Fall Break volunteer opportunities

fall break opps

Whether you’re a college student home for Fall Break, or a parent looking for a wholesome (and free!) way for your kiddos to pass the time, we’re here to connect you to volunteer opportunities at lots of great Nashville organizations. The opportunities highlighted below fall between Oct. 5-13, but many agencies have opportunities available all season long. Click the title of each opportunity to learn more and sign up.

Also: look for ways to give back to your community year-round on our calendar.

1. Learn to garden while prepping for the upcoming harvest

Bellevue Edible Learning Lab Inc.
Minimum age: 16, or 4 with an adult
When: Saturdays, Oct. 5 and Oct. 12

The Bell Garden serves as a teaching and learning lab for volunteers, students of Bellevue Middle Prep, and the community. Volunteers can do a variety of things, including sow seeds and harvest plants, water and weed, work in the greenhouse, tend the chicken flock, and can and preserve fruits and veggies. The garden runs on volunteer power, and no experience is necessary.

2. Serve meals to nourish those in need

St. John’s United Methodist Church
Minimum age: 18, or 13 with an adult
When: Thursday, Oct. 10

Thursday Night Community Meals at St. Johns UMC offer free, nutritious meals in a safe, friendly, and caring environment to a diverse group of clients at risk of hunger and some experiencing homelessness. Volunteers help with last-minute preparations, serving the meal, helping clean up, and socializing with diners.

3. Maintain a Nashville treasure while learning about history

The Nashville City Cemetery Association
Minimum age: 18, or 16 with an adult
When: Saturday, Oct. 12

Enjoy the peacefulness of the Nashville City Cemetery while working to restore the grounds and prepare for winter. By clearing brush, weeding, and raking leaves, volunteers will help preserve a historical landmark, and show respect to an important piece of Nashville history. The Nashville City Cemetery Association, Inc., was formed in 1998 to protect, preserve, restore, and raise public awareness of the Nashville City Cemetery. Bring drinking water, gloves, and any gardening tools you have!

4. Take tickets at the Nashville Film Festival

The Nashville Film Festival
Minimum age: 16
When: Thursday, Oct. 3, through Saturday, Oct. 12

Lights, camera, action! The Nashville Film Festival is casting A-list volunteers to assist at its annual festival. Volunteers will usher guests to their seats, collect and distribute ballots for film judging, set up and tear down, check credentials for VIP areas and ticketed events, and provide light cleaning of theaters and VIP areas. Plus: Volunteers receive festival vouchers.

 5. Feed and socialize with school-aged children

Martha O’Bryan Center
Minimum age: 18, or 12 with an adult
When: Mondays, Oct. 7 through Nov. 18

Interact with children and families while serving a hot meal to those in the middle of a food desert. Martha O’Bryan’s Family Resource Center hosts Kid’s Café every Monday for those in need. Volunteers will help set up, serve food, and try and make the community comfortable while they share a meal together.

6. Advocate for recycling at the Cornelia Fort Pickin’ Party

Cornelia Fort Pickin’ Party
Minimum age: 15, or 12 with an adult
When: Saturday, Oct. 5

Help make the Pickin’ Party waste free by assisting attendees in correctly sorting their food waste into the compost bin, and all recyclables into the recycling bin. With volunteers’ help,  80 percent of waste can be recycled into new materials. Training will be provided prior to the event. The Cornelia Fort Pickin’ Party combines the tastes and talents of East Nashville to help preserve one of the city’s most unique landmarks, the Cornelia Fort AirPark.

7. Cheer on cyclists with Bike MS

Bike MS
Minimum age: 12
When: Saturday, Oct. 5

Smiling faces and encouragement are needed for the Bike to Jack & Back bicycle ride. Volunteers will also help with setup, teardown, and food service. Bike MS is the fundraising cycling series of the National MS Society, and to date, has raised more than $1.3 billion to end Multiple Sclerosis.

8. Offer support at the Nashville AIDS Walk

Nashville CARES
Minimum age: 18, or 5 with an adult
When: Friday and Saturday, Oct. 4 and 5

Offering a full day of activities, the 28th annual Nashville AIDS Walk needs event volunteers. In addition to celebrating the amazing work of Nashville CARES, volunteers are asked to help set up, register walkers, hand out water, and offer assistance as hundreds of supporters come out to bring awareness to ending the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Middle Tennessee. The Nashville AIDS walk is a family-friendly event that has raised more than $3 million for the cause. Pre-registered volunteers receive a T-shirt and lunch.

9. Create crafts with The Family Center

The Family Center
Minimum age: 18, or 1 with an adult
When: Saturday, Oct. 5

Grab your glitter and start crafting with The Family Center to make calm-down bottles for their clients. Volunteers will fill bottles with water and glitter to act as a calming mechanism. The Family Center works to break multi-generational cycles of child abuse, neglect, and trauma by providing a safe, supportive space where parents and/or their children can connect and grow.

 

HON Community Partners: Do YOU have family-friendly volunteer opportunities during Fall Break (Oct. 5-13) that aren’t featured here? Let us know so we can add them!

Celebrating AmeriCorps’ 25th Anniversary: Q&A with Hands On Nashville’s first AmeriCorps member

The AmeriCorps program celebrates its 25th anniversary this year. To commemorate the occasion, we checked in with Susannah Fotopulos, the first AmeriCorps member ever placed at Hands On Nashville. Fotopulos went on to found and direct Plant the Seed, a Nashville nonprofit that provides experiential education to children ages 4-14 through garden-based learning.

When were you an AmeriCorps member? Where did you serve and what role did you have?

In 2003 I served at Hands On Nashville as their inaugural Citizen Action AmeriCorps member. This was a specific type of indirect service position created in partnership with the HandsOn Network and designed to increase volunteer opportunities in HandsOn communities.

How did AmeriCorps prepare you to start Plant the Seed? 

My placement as the first AmeriCorps member at Hands On Nashville was during a time of rapid growth, which gave me an amazing chance to build a program from idea to delivery. It gave me a testing ground to conceive how to address a community need, deliver that program, and evaluate its effectiveness. My AmeriCorps service year was such an amazing way to grow my entrepreneurial spirit!

How does it feel to come full circle with AmeriCorps, having four members serve at your own nonprofit? 

It’s wild! I feel like having four AmeriCorps members is a cool indicator of our growth and a marker of scale and legitimacy in our ability to manage AmeriCorps members. I also see it as a way for Plant the Seed to live out our mission of being a learning organization by helping young adults develop the skills and next steps for their careers.

What’s something you are looking forward to teaching these members that you took from your own experience with AmeriCorps?  

I hope these new AmeriCorps members learn flexibility, gratitude, resilience, how to create something they can call their own, how to bring an open mind to new learning opportunities, and how to feel like they have made a legitimate difference to effect positive change in the world.

Resolve to Serve Stories: NECAT

Rhoda Scherer remembers when she first stepped into the studios of Nashville Education, Community, and Arts Television (NECAT) five years ago.

“I had no clue about television,” Scherer says. She’d been invited to visit the studio by a producer she’d met while volunteering at her niece and nephew’s school yard sale.

“I came to NECAT, I sat in on one of her productions, and I just fell in love with the studio.”

Scherer — who now produces a show called “Psychology Matters” — learned how to run the cameras, lights, and control room through NECAT’s training program.

“You learn in the classes exactly how to use everything,” Scherer says. “They make it so easy to learn.”

That’s music to the ears of former NECAT CEO Trish Crist, who adds that the technology of a TV studio is not as complicated as you might think.

“The skills are mastered pretty quickly,” she said. “Then you get to use them as part of a team to help someone else bring his vision to life and express himself on television.” Crew volunteers earn credit hours they can apply toward advanced production classes, where they can learn green screen effects and specialized camera work.

Super Intern Jay Witt
Jay Witt

NECAT’s channels currently broadcast more than 400 shows to 19 Middle Tennessee counties. Because programming is produced by community members for community members, diverse viewpoints and topics can get air time.

As Scherer, who has a psychology degree, gained experience in the studio, she knew she wanted to transition to producing her own show. She created “Psychology Matters” to focus on mental-health awareness. Her show features experts who answer questions that, often, Scherer crowdsources from her show’s Facebook audience.

For Jay Witt, another NECAT volunteer, helping others create TV shows is a powerful way to facilitate creative expression. Witt came to the studio in 2017 to attend Spring Break TV Camp. Like Scherer, he had little knowledge of TV production. Now, he manages the network’s Super Crew — which is responsible for all crew positions for the Our Nashville series, where each episode features a different nonprofit.

Witt, who’s now considering a career in film, has some advice for anyone interested in volunteering at NECAT, but who might be intimidated by what seems like a lot of technical hurdles: “Don’t be nervous at all. Even if it’s something you don’t end up loving as a future career, it’s still a great experience.”

NECAT Sports TV Camp
NECAT Sports TV Camp participants

Getting Started With NECAT

Want to dip your toes in the TV-production waters? NECAT offers a free two-night TV production class, where you will learn all the technical elements of working in a TV studio —  camera operation, video switching, audio engineering, conducting interviews, lighting design and teleprompter control.

From there, you can choose one of two pathways — for Producers or Technicians.

Technician Pathway — allows you to crew on any NECAT-produced show
$40 annual fee

Producer Pathway — allows you to book the studio and produce your own NECAT show
$80 annual fee 
• Once you’ve completed the aforementioned free production class, those who choose the Producer Pathway must take a two-night TV Pre-Production class (for a $50 one-time fee), which teaches how to organize and plan a show for success.

Super Crew with HON Our Nashville shoot
NECAT’s Super Crew (plus some HONies)

Interested in volunteering with NECAT? Check out their available opportunities here, or sign up for training courses here

Photos courtesy of NECAT.

Nashville’s Fall 2019 College Service Fairs

It’s (almost) back-to-school time! College service fairs are a great chance for your nonprofit to connect with students and share your volunteer and intern opportunities. Please email the contact listed for each school in order to register your agency.  

August 14: Fisk Volunteer Fair
11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Contact: Tashaye Woods (twoods@fisk.edu)

August 28: Vanderbilt Service Organization Fair
1-3 p.m.
Contact: Meagan Smith (meagan.smith@vanderbilt.edu)

August 28: Tigers Day Out at Tennessee State University
11 a.m.-2 p.m.
Contact: Shirley Nix-Davis (snixdavi@tnstate.edu)

September 3: Trevecca Volunteer Fair
9:30-10:30 a.m.
Contact: Daniel Neiderhiser (dlneiderhiser@trevecca.edu)

September 4: Lipscomb Volunteer Fair
9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Contact: Christin Schatzer (Christin.shatzer@lipscomb.edu)

September 12: Nashville State Resource Awareness and Volunteer Day
10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Contact: Evelyn Hadley (evelyn.hadley@nscc.edu)

September 30: Belmont Community Connections Fair
10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Contact: Tim Stewart (tim.stewart@belmont.edu)

Does your Middle Tennessee college or university have a service fair you’d like us to include in this roundup? Let us know!

Resolve to Serve Stories: Nashville Dolphins

Edward McClarty hadn’t been searching for a long-term volunteering gig when he was asked to bring smoothies to the Nashville Dolphins’ Swim-a-Thon.

“I didn’t give it much thought at the time, other than it was my way of giving back to my local community,” says McClarty, who had just become the owner of a Smoothie King. “Obviously, God had other plans.”

Shortly after, McClarty began prepping for an Iron Man Triathlon, which required a lot of swimming. He was training in the Gordon Jewish Community Center’s pool — the same pool where the Nashville Dolphins were holding a swim class — when he had an idea.

“I asked if I could get in the water and assist the athletes, and it just developed from there,” he says.

The Nashville Dolphins’ mission is to enable people with special needs to experience the physical and emotional benefits of swimming. The Dolphins provide free learn-to-swim classes and a free swim team to children and adults with special needs.

“Volunteers continue to come back because they are able to see the direct impact they are having with our organization,” says Program Director Megan Kelly. “They are working with the same swimmers each week so they are able to see their growth and progress and build friendships with our swimmers.”

Ed 4 square
Edward McClarty

Since that afternoon when he got in the pool with the Dolphins, McClarty — AKA Coach Ed — has spent his Tuesday nights leading swim practice. He decides the curriculum and exercises, gets swimmers ready for practice, and conducts the drills.

“We run the swim practice just like any other swim team,” Coach Ed explains. He says he enjoys seeing what each athlete is capable of and helping them work hard to maximize their potential.

For Coach Ed, who has been swimming with the Dolphins since 2004, serving with the organization has been a spiritual endeavor.

“I’m so blessed to be a part of this. I’m so happy that the parents and the athletes want me there to participate, and I’m grateful to offer whatever it is that I offer to them.”

If you or someone you know is interested in volunteering with the Nashville Dolphins, express interest here

Photos provided by Nashville Dolphins.

AmeriCorps Member Spotlight: Jasmine Lucas

Jasmine Lucas joined the HON AmeriCorps Program in late March. Read on to learn more about her!

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Jasmine Lucas

Community Outreach Coordinator at Hands On Nashville

What’s something you’ve done during your service term, or something you’re planning, that has been particularly rewarding?

Being out with the volunteers and recognizing them for what they are contributing to their community. It has been exhilarating to meet individual volunteers who walk completely different lives from one another meet up and commune over serving the community. I believe there is nothing more beautiful than that. I plan on recognizing our volunteers directly through social media in future Community Partner events. I’m excited to be the voice of HON and put forth the faces of our volunteers!

What drew you to serve with AmeriCorps?

What drew me to serve with AmeriCorps was that I saw it as a chance for me to be a part of something bigger than myself. That has been my driving force for a long while. I have made many personal, developmental decisions based on this standard, and it has yet to fail me. I have always grown to be a better person when I made a decision to be a part of something that is bigger than myself, and I am confident AmeriCorps is that next “bigger than myself” opportunity in this season of my life.

What’s the plan once you’ve completed your term?

After AmeriCorps I am not quite sure what I will start doing. So far, I plan to serve another term with a nonprofit here in Nashville. After that, I may begin working with a local nonprofit in Nashville, or I may travel the world teaching English as a Second Language (I have a lot of international friends who want me to visit 🙂 )

How do you spend your time when you’re not serving or volunteering?

In my free time I partake in a variety of hobbies including crocheting, writing/reading poetry, watching movies with my roommates, and going on excursions around Nashville with new friends. You will probably also find me staking out at local coffee shops as I read and write.

Applications are now being accepted for the 2019-2020 AmeriCorps cohort. Learn more and apply here.

Check out this summer’s family-friendly volunteer opportunities

summer vol opps

Whether you’re a parent looking for a wholesome (and free!) way for your kiddos to pass the time this summer, or you’re a teen looking for a way to beef up your resumé before applying for college, we’re here to connect you to volunteer opportunities at lots of great Nashville organizations. Click the title of each opportunity to learn more and sign up.

Look for ways to give back to your community year-round on our calendar.

Be a Blood Services Donor Ambassador
American Red Cross—Nashville Area Chapter
Minimum age:
13
When: Ongoing

Help save lives while honing your customer-service skills. Volunteers will promote blood donation and ensure long-term commitment for regular blood donations.

Make reading easy as a Librarian’s Assistant
Nashville Public Library (multiple locations)
Minimum age: 13
When: Ongoing

Volunteers enable the thousands of patrons who visit the library’s 21 locations each day to read, conduct research, and continue learning. Plus volunteers get easy access to the library’s amazing collections. And air conditioning!

Organize, sort, and support at the Family Store
The Salvation Army
Minimum age: 16, or 14 with an adult
When: Ongoing

The Salvation Army Family Store is looking for volunteers to hang and organize clothing, sort items in the warehouse, and assist cashiers with wrapping purchases. Bonus: Close proximity to amazing thrift finds!

Get your hands dirty to feed hungry families
Second Harvest Food Bank
Minimum age: 18, or 8 with an adult
When: Ongoing

Farm to Families volunteers support local food producers by helping care for a wide variety of crops and other plants. In return, Second Harvest partner farms donate a portion of the bounty to people who need fresh, healthy food. Volunteer projects vary and may include weeding, mulching, composting, harvesting, or gleaning. Green thumbs not required!

Cultivate professional skills on the Teen Team
Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Minimum age: 17, or 13 with an adult
When: Ongoing

This youth-oriented team enables volunteers to develop their leadership, professionalism, customer service, and problem-solving skills in a fun environment. Volunteers assist staff with hands-on, fun programs and greet museum guests.

Connect with elderly residents as a wheelchair escort 
McKendree Village Inc.
Minimum age: 18, or 13 with an adult
When: Sundays and Wednesdays, multiple dates available

Cheery, physically active volunteers are needed to help push residents in wheelchairs to chapel services. This is a great opportunity to enrich the lives of older residents and build meaningful one-on-one relationships.

Beautify the Radnor Lake Area
Radnor Lake State Natural Area
Minimum age: 13, or 10 with an adult
When: Fridays, multiple dates

Every hand helps keep the Radnor Lake area beautiful for Nashville residents, visitors, and wildlife. Volunteers are needed to build out and mulch trails, remove invasive plants, clean up streams, and more. Projects happen rain or shine.

Nashville Dolphins
Minimum age: 16, or 13 with an adult
When: Thursdays through July

Stay dry while helping swimmers stay safe! Volunteers stay on deck and assist the heacd coach to help guide swimmers and ensure that they are having fun. No swim team or swim coach experience is required.

Help Musicians Corner Concert guests have a great time
The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park
Minimum age: 16, or 14 with an adult
When: Fridays and Saturdays through June (with some Thursdays)

Hear great music while helping put on a culturally rich event. Volunteers work alongside interns and full-time staff to assist with giving audience surveys, monitoring the parking lots, staffing merchandise stations, and working water and beverage stations. Volunteers will receive training and assignments on site.

Grow and harvest while learning about gardening
Bellevue Edible Learning Lab Inc.
Minimum age: 16, or 4 with an adult
When: Saturdays

The Bell Garden serves as a teaching and learning lab for volunteers, students of Bellevue Middle Prep, and the community! Volunteers can do a variety of things, including sow seeds and harvest plants, water and weed, work in the greenhouse, tend the chicken flock, can and preserve fruits and veggies. The garden runs on volunteer power, and no experience is necessary.

Make meals to nourish those fighting cancer
The Heimerdinger Foundation
Minimum age: 19, or 13 with an adult
When: Ongoing

Members of the Heimerdinger Foundation’s volunteer kitchen crew are involved in the meal-making process — from prep to delivery. Volunteers should exhibit positive energy, be dependable, and be willing to work as a team.

HON Community Partners: Do YOU have family-friendly volunteer opportunities that aren’t featured here? Let us know so we can add them!

 

Hands On Nashville announces recipients of the 2019 Mary Catherine Strobel Volunteer Awards

April 30, 2019 – Middle Tennesseans were honored for their volunteerism at Hands On Nashville’s 33rd Annual Mary Catherine Strobel Volunteer Awards, presented by Advance Financial Foundation.

The award recipients are as follows:

  • Lily Hensiek – Capacity-building Volunteer Award
  • Cross Point Church – Civic Volunteer Group Award
  • Uncle Classic Barbershop – Corporate Volunteerism Award
  • Ella Delevante – Direct Service Volunteer Award (Ages five to 20)
  • Marc Pearson – Direct Service Volunteer Award (Ages 21 to 49)
  • Charles Black – Direct Service Volunteer Award (Ages 50+)

More than 600 volunteers and community members attended the luncheon and ceremony at Music City Center. The annual event recognizes volunteers for their outstanding contributions to the community, and celebrates the life of Mary Catherine Strobel, a Nashvillian with an outstanding dedication to service.

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Nashville musician Tristan McIntosh began the ceremony with a celebration of service.

Former “American Idol” contestant Tristan McIntosh — a member of the local volunteer collective Musicians On Call — opened the awards ceremony with a performance in recognition of the award nominees and finalists. Great-grandson of Mary Catherine Strobel, Benjamin Strobel, shared an invocation prior to the meal; Charles Strobel, son of Mary Catherine Strobel and founding director of Room In The Inn, closed the ceremony with remarks about his mother’s legacy and the value of service.

“For Mary Catherine Strobel, giving back wasn’t even something she did; it was who she was,” said Lori Shinton, President and CEO of Hands On Nashville. “That same spirit lives on when each of these volunteers gets up in the morning and thinks about how they can make someone else’s day better — how they can serve others using their hands, their tools, their knowledge, their creativity.”

Community members submitted more than 130 nominations for the 2019 Strobel Volunteer Awards.

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Mary Catherine Strobel’s children — Jerry (from left), Alice, Veronica, and Charles.

“This luncheon emphasizes the highest ideals of human life and the spirit of giving,” said Charles Strobel. “We are delighted that all of the nominees — both those who are finalists and those who were nominated — are receiving this special recognition for embracing that spirit.”

Below is a list of award recipients for each category and a brief description of the volunteer work for which they are recognized.

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Lily Hensiek

Lily Hensiek received the 2019 Capacity-building Volunteer Award for her work with Lily’s Garden, which has raised more than $2 million for pediatric cancer research and treatment at Monroe Carrell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. The award honors individuals who provide significant operational or administrative support to a nonprofit agency, faith-based ministry or community organization.

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Sarah Stephanoff of Cross Point Church 

Cross Point Church, whose members support children in Youth Villages group homes, received the 2019 Civic Volunteer Group Award. The category honors representatives of civic, membership, faith-based or non-corporate groups that volunteer together for a specific cause or issue.

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Amy Tanksley and Trisha Lou Meinzer of Uncle Classic Barbershop

Uncle Classic Barbershop received the 2019 Corporate Volunteerism Award in honor of its ongoing service to Park Center. The award pays tribute to businesses that have robust employee volunteer programs with high levels of participation and impact.

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Stephen Francescon, Community Relations Manager at Piedmont Natural Gas; Ella Delevante; Lori Shinton

The Direct Service Volunteer Awards recognize individuals who have contributed significant volunteer time, energy and/or resources to support an agency’s constituents. Ella Delevante, a volunteer for Nations Ministries, Metro Nashville Public Schools and Nashville International Center for Empowerment, received the 2019 award for the category honoring nominees of ages five to 20.

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Mark Czuba, Business Unit Leader at U.S. Smokeless Tobacco; Marc Pearson; Lori Shinton

Marc Pearson, a volunteer with PENCIL/John Overton High School, received the 2019 Direct Service Volunteer Award for ages 21 to 49. Pearson leads efforts to prepare students for engineering careers through mock interviews, a job shadow program, and more.

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Charles Black (center)

 Charles Black, a volunteer with Dismas House, received the 2019 Direct Service Volunteer Award for ages 50 plus. Black is an ambassador, mentor, and driver for the men of Dismas House, where he was once himself a client.

Click here to view a photo gallery of the event.

All photos are credit of Kerry Woo Photography.

For More Information

Please contact Lindsey Turner at Hands On Nashville: (615) 298-1108 ext. 415; lindsey@hon.org.

About the Mary Catherine Strobel Volunteer Awards

The Mary Catherine Strobel Volunteer Awards are named in memory of the late Mary Catherine Strobel, known for her extensive and charitable efforts toward improving the lives of Middle Tennessee’s homeless, impoverished and less fortunate populations. The annual awards ceremony celebrates her service and recognizes those who continue her legacy. View all nominees for the 2019 awards.

About Hands On Nashville

Hands On Nashville (HON) builds capacity for individuals and agencies to meet needs through service. Its programs connect volunteers to opportunities supporting 140-plus nonprofits, schools, and other civic organizations; help these partners reimagine volunteer potential; and bring awareness to the challenges facing the people and places in our community. For more information, visit HON.org or call (615) 298-1108.